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Gamma ray burst GRB170817A is believed to have originated from the merger of Neutron Star(NS)-Neutron Star(NS). From this article on the associated gravitational wave detection GW170817:

The gravitational wave signal, designated GW 170817, had a duration of approximately 100 seconds, and shows the characteristics in intensity and frequency expected of the inspiral of two neutron stars. Analysis of the slight variation in arrival time of the GW at the three detector locations (two LIGO and one Virgo) yielded an approximate angular direction to the source. Independently, a short (~2 seconds' duration) gamma-ray burst, designated GRB 170817A, was detected by the Fermi and INTEGRAL spacecraft beginning 1.7 seconds after the GW merger signal. These detectors have very limited directional sensitivity, but indicated a large area of the sky which overlapped the gravitational wave position. It has been a long-standing hypothesis that short gamma-ray bursts are caused by neutron star mergers.

Are there lists or compilations or reviews of all reported gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) together with an assigned or hypothesized event or source that produced it?

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  • $\begingroup$ I would recommend you to follow GCN (gcn.gsfc.nasa.gov). It will send you emails when any discovery related to GRB has been made: starting from high energy photon detection from facilities like Fermi, and following up search then monitoring. I think at least that is a start. $\endgroup$ – Kornpob Bhirombhakdi Oct 29 '20 at 14:53
  • $\begingroup$ I think the question is pretty clear and should not be closed for "Needs details or clarity". $\endgroup$ – uhoh Oct 31 '20 at 3:41
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks for modifications of the questions. After long discussions, someone concern me that due instrumental constrants it is not possible to get all sources of all GRBs. Only few GRBs sources can be known(eg. GRB170817A). $\endgroup$ – sundar45 Nov 1 '20 at 6:12
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I found a database that contains all GRBs from April 1991-August 1991. However, it has 1637 registered GRBs so it would probably be enough for your purposes. Here is the link-Goddard Space Center GRB Archive. Also, just a fair warning, that website is incredibly old and very difficult to use, it took me nearly fifteen minutes to navigate to the actual database. Hope this helps!

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