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I don't feel that way myself but some might find it really strange and wierd that it has differential rotation and feel that it's a contradiction. They may say "How is it possible?" I am asking on behalf of others who might have that question what assumptions they are making and how to break them.

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I think they're not taking into account the Coriolis force in the frame of reference of the part of the outer layer of the sun at each latitude. I can't quite think of a proof that the outer layer of the sun would be predicted to have differential rotation. However, when you realize about the Coriolis force acting on the convection currents, you see that it does not give you a proof that there shouldn't be differential rotation. Maybe the part at one latitude then exerts a force on the part at an adjacent latitude until the rates of the two layers satisfy a certain equation.

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  • $\begingroup$ I think that answers should not begin with "I think" followed by "I can't quite think of..." This should be part of your question, not the answer to it. Answer posts need to really strive to be proper answers, not speculation. Why not move this back into the question and wait for an answer with some more certainty? $\endgroup$ – uhoh Dec 19 '20 at 13:48
  • $\begingroup$ @uhoh I think the answer is useful because what it does is resolve the apparent contradiction. $\endgroup$ – Timothy Dec 19 '20 at 19:23

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