9
$\begingroup$

Observed on 9th of Jan 2021 in Newcastle Upon Tyne (UK) looking WSW at a little after Midnight.

enter image description here

$\endgroup$
15
$\begingroup$

If it was rather small, I suppose you were looking at the Pleiades, which is an open star cluster (not a constellation). Take a look at this web application: https://stellarium-web.org/ You can set a time and location and find constellations and other objects really easily.

$\endgroup$
1
15
$\begingroup$

Yes, those are the Pleiades. The form corresponds exactly to the photo below:

Pleiades + Venus

(source: Star-Gazing - the disk below the Pleiades is Venus, this is a photo from April)

As @theWrongAlice says, they're not a constellation, but they are part of Taurus (the Bull).

$\endgroup$
1
  • $\begingroup$ Is it just me, or does Glorfindel look like Alexander Armstrong? $\endgroup$ – James K Feb 18 at 23:22
8
$\begingroup$

In such situations, I find Astrometry.net particularly helpful. Feeding it your image, I got this result:

Of course, the stars Pleione, Sterope, and Taygeta are enough to identify the Pleiades.

While in this case it's fairly easy to identify the Pleiades by inspection alone and verify this, for less recognisable cases Astrometry.net is a very handy tool. They've got an online version, where you upload a photo and the recognition is done server-side, or you could install the app, either from repos or build from source.

$\endgroup$
1
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks. That's a great resource. $\endgroup$ – Undistraction Jan 11 at 22:26

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.