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When (yyyy-mm-dd) does the north pole of uranus most nearly point towards the sun?

The information I've found suggests this happened in 1944 or 1945, but would like to find a more precise date or alternately what the heliocentric longitude is.

The "Poles of Astronomical Bodies" article on Wikipedia lists the RA and Dec, but doesn't include the Geocentric distance (otherwise, I think I could just translate between geocentric and heliocentric coordinate systems and have my answer).

Thanks Tim

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I have made an interactive simulation of Uranus and its seasons at https://ecliptiqc.ca/UranusEN.php. Playing with it, I get the north pole of Uranus pointing sunwards in early 1946 (my steps are 6 months, so I can’t be more precise for now).

The actual date may be slightly different, as I use a “fixed” orbit instead of the osculating elements, but it would be a few days or weeks off at most.

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According to JPL HORIZONS, the sub-solar latitude on Uranus has maxima on 1946-04-03 and 2030-04-11, and Uranus's heliocentric J2000 ecliptic longitude at those times is 77.54°.

If I put the pole coordinates from the IAU WGCCRE report through the NED coordinate calculator, I get a J2000 ecliptic longitude of 77.65° for Uranus's south pole. The solstice longitude is slightly different due to Uranus's orbital inclination.

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