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After looking at this question, I am wondering, how long does it take for a galaxy or other space object, to disappear from our view from the Milky Way due to the expansion of the universe? Assume GN-z11 is our target object here, or some other notable distant object.

Edit: As @PM2Ring said in a comment, "No galaxy that is observable today ever disappears (but does become increasingly redshifted." So when does a target galaxy get so redshifted that we cannot see it anymore?

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    $\begingroup$ It depends on how you define "disappear". ;) From this comment on that page: No galaxy that is observable today ever disappears (but does become increasingly redshifted). Also see astronomy.stackexchange.com/a/19910/16685 which has a helpful diagram. $\endgroup$
    – PM 2Ring
    Jan 29 at 21:45
  • $\begingroup$ Pm 2 Ring do you mean that there is no object far enough and receding fast enough to cross an event horizon? I was thinking it is possible. Perhaps I should study again the famous article on "expanding confusion"... $\endgroup$
    – Alchimista
    Jan 30 at 13:59

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