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Are there published tables for Lunar Inclination?

I am interested because I believe this determines the degree of "Diurnal Inequality" of tides. There are tons of publishes tables of tides and a NOAA site shows tides graphically. Can the inclination (maybe) be inferred from moon's rise and set times?

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  • $\begingroup$ Do you mean lunar declination e.g. this article on tide formation I think the lunar orbit's inclination changes a much smaller amount and over a longer timescale Figure 4-10 of this. In general, the details of the Moon's orbit are very complicated and large numbers of periodic terms are needed to give an accurate position $\endgroup$ – astrosnapper Apr 15 at 21:13
  • $\begingroup$ Related: astronomy.stackexchange.com/q/29932/16685 Lunar theory is complicated; also see Lunar standstill. Tides are even more complicated, see physics.stackexchange.com/a/121858/123208 $\endgroup$ – PM 2Ring Apr 16 at 8:09
  • $\begingroup$ @astrosnapper, Oops, yes, I did mean "declination". And, I am not interested in the ghastly math if it IS so complicated, all the more reason there should be pre-calculated tables, No? $\endgroup$ – DontPanic Apr 17 at 12:46
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It is tabulated, and available online in several places. One of them is the Nautical Almanac at thenauticalalmanc.com. It has the position of the moon for every hour this year and a number of past years. It shows the position as a GHA, for Greenwich hour angle, which is the west longitude of the location on Earth that the moon is directly above. It also has the declination, which, you seem to know, is the latitude of that position. Another thing you might find useful is the HP (horizontal parallax) column which can be used to determine the distance to the moon.

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