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The HubbleESA video Timelapse of Jupiter’s auroras is discussed in the ESAHubble page Timelapse of Jupiter’s auroras and includes the identifier heic1613a. However there's no clear information there about the period of observation.

Note that there is also the page heic1613 — Photo Release Hubble captures vivid auroras in Jupiter’s atmosphere

Question: How much real time was compressed into this 10 second long timelapse Hubble video of Jupiter's aurora? Were the original images taken over a period of minutes, hours, or days?

I don't notice any breaks, and I think that Jupiter will always be eclipsed by Earth seen from Hubble's low Earth orbit.

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It seems that the planet is marked with longitudinal lines every 10 degrees, and so you can measure off the video that the planet rotates by about a little less than three longitudinal lines, or about 30 degrees. As Jupiter has a rotation period of just under 10 hours, the length of time can be estimated as about 10×30/360 hours: 50 minutes, or possibly slightly less.

That is consistent with an observation lasting for half an orbit of Hubble, which has a 95-minute orbit.

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