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What is the typical range of a comet's mass loss per second to its dust and gas tails, while it is naked-eye visible from Earth?

I'm aware this is going to be a very broad range and expect it to cover multiple orders of magnitude, so any specific examples — Hale–Bopp, Halley's, or similar, at any point where their apparent magnitude was enough to be visible without a telescope — would be perfectly valid answers, even though I'm mainly curious about the minimum.

[Target level: I'm an amateur enthusiast, not a professional].

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There is no typical value. If you insist, use about 1kg/s but allow deviations of at least 2 orders or magnitude, depending on comet, Earth distance etc. One can make reasonable deductions from observations of the comets in the last 35 years.

M. Choukroun et al. and cited sources therein estimate the mass loss rate of 67/P Churyumov-Gerasimenko at around $10^{28}$ molecules/s at peak mass loss and an overall around $10^{10}$ kg (corresponding to ~1kg/s) during the whole perihelion passage over the course of the 2 years. Moreno et al give dust loss rates around 1 to 1000 kg/s during perihelion passage. G. C. Sanzovo et al. do a comparative study for a number of recent bright comets and get similar numbers.

There exists an old study from 1987 by Kresak, L. & Kresakova, M. which estimates the mass loss rates for many comets per century giving values between $10^8$ and $10^{12}$ kg / century (higher end is Halley) - which generally are not too far off of what is quoted above, but take these values with a grain of salt as far fewer in-situ measurments to calibrate models were available by then and science on comets has progressed a lot since.

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