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Hubble seems to have a issues since weeks. Here what NASA says:

NASA completed a formal review to assess all operations related to Hubble’s possible switch to backup hardware, which may occur later this week. Investigation into the cause of the payload computer issue is ongoing.

July 12, 2021 - Review to Assess and Minimize Risks for Possible Switch to Backup Completed

NASA completed a review to assess all factors and minimize risks related to Hubble’s possible switch to backup hardware, which may occur later this week. Investigation into the cause of the payload computer issue is ongoing.

I am bit worried about the telescope, since I heard somewhere that the next (robotic) mission which will move the telescope to its burning fate in Earth's atmosphere. I learned that there has even been a hook installed during the [last Space Shuttle mission[(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/STS-125) for that purpose. I am now hoping that somebody can point me to more details on the payload computer and its role for astronomy.

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    $\begingroup$ Did you look at the earlier announcements, further down on the NASA page? They provide more details about what the payload computer does? $\endgroup$ Jul 14 at 8:16
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    $\begingroup$ @PeterErwin. I guess I should read more of the old news on the NASA page, you are right. Still I would not mind if somebody could answer my question with a summary. :-) $\endgroup$
    – B--rian
    Jul 14 at 8:18
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The payload computer’s purpose is to control and coordinate the science instruments and monitor them for health and safety purposes.

This news release provides some information about the problem and possible solutions:

The computer halted on Sunday, June 13. An attempt to restart the computer failed on Monday, June 14. Initial indications pointed to a degrading computer memory module as the source of the computer halt. When the operations team attempted to switch to a back-up memory module, however, the command to initiate the backup module failed to complete. Another attempt was conducted on both modules Thursday evening to obtain more diagnostic information while again trying to bring those memory modules online. However, those attempts were not successful.

The payload computer is a NASA Standard Spacecraft Computer-1 (NSSC-1) system built in the 1980s that is located on the Science Instrument Command and Data Handling unit. The computer’s purpose is to control and coordinate the science instruments and monitor them for health and safety purposes. It is fully redundant in that a second computer, along with its associated hardware, exists on orbit that can be switched over to in the event of a problem. Both computers can access and use any of four independent memory modules, which each contain 64K of Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) memory. The payload computer uses only one memory module operationally at a time, with the other three serving as backups.

You can find some additional information about the computer systems at Wikipedia

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