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Somehow, none of the many articles I've read about the recent discovery of electron-capture supernovae has specifically said what they leave behind as remnants.....

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    $\begingroup$ Perhaps you could cite or link to some of those articles. It would make it much clearer what kind of research you've already done. $\endgroup$
    – James K
    Aug 4 at 23:06
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A neutron star.

Heger et. al. (2002) state

[There is] a narrow range, ∼ 9−10 M⊙, where degenerate oxygen-neon cores are formed that either collapse due to electron capture (Barkat et al. 1974; Miyaji et al. 1980; Nomoto 1984; Habets 1986; Miyaji & Nomoto 1987; Nomoto 1987; Nomoto & Hashimoto 1988) and make a neutron star

Such relatively small stars may not supernova at all. They may lose their envelope and produce white dwarfs. They are on the border between those stars that will undergo collapse and those that won't. This is why they are rare.

The supernova, if it forms, will be faint.

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Core collapse electron capture supernovae are expected to leave a low-mass, low speed neutron star remnant (e.g. Gessner & Janka 2018).

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