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I know black holes are extraordinarily powerful when it comes to the gravitational pull.

But I wanted to get something clarified - is the gravity stronger at the event horizon (like, on the very edge of it), or near the event horizon?

Because it kind of seems baffling that gravity can still be at play at the event horizon, when there's nothing there. Plus, I keep saying that gravity is stronger near the event horizon, and I wanted to make sure I was right. Thanks.

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    $\begingroup$ "Because it kind of seems baffling that gravity can still be at play at the event horizon, when there's nothing there. " Can't you say exactly the same thing about all the points outside the event horizon? (Never mind inside.) $\endgroup$
    – D. Halsey
    Aug 28 at 23:03
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The strength of the gravity of the black hole, that is the curvature of spacetime increases beyond the event horizon and tends to infinite when you approach the singularity.

It is very hard to visualise the structure of space near a black hole. We are used to flat, or nearly flat spacetime. But a black hole is nothing like flat spacetime. We are used to the idea that we can go in all directions. We are used to time being something independent of space. That isn't true for black holes, where space and time are curved together.

The event horizon is regular part of space, the gravity there is intense, (and may be enough to pull you apart) but the gravity gets stronger as you fall past the event horizon and increases towards infinity.

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