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This might be a dumb question, but would it be possible that during the star Altair's formation, the centrifugal forces became so large that its planets were flung away into space?

Or could a passing object have snaked the planets from Altair and simultaneously increased its rotation rate?

It's an odd coincidence that one of the few close-by stars that don't have exoplanets that we can detect rotates so swiftly.

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  • $\begingroup$ IN your last sentence you describe Altair as a planet when you shoud write star. $\endgroup$ Sep 3, 2021 at 18:48
  • $\begingroup$ @M.A.Golding Thanks. But please do feel free to edit a question that contains an obvious typo. There is absolutely no need to try to embarass the author by explicitly pointing out the mistake, instead of just making the correction yourself. $\endgroup$ Sep 4, 2021 at 22:02

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No.

There is no mechanism that can transfer angular momentum from the star to a planetary system. The two aren't linked. The spinning of the star doesn't pull the planets forward and "fling" them.

There are some small tidal linking between the star and the planets, but these are not enough to eject planets over the life span of such a star.

Altair doesn't have any known planets. It may have planets, but they don't orbit at a distance or be of a size that we are able to detect.

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  • $\begingroup$ But during the star's formation the distribution of the mass throughout the protoplanetary system might have been much different. And you may regard my question as asking about the correlation of spin and present-day-technology-detectable exoplanets. $\endgroup$ Sep 4, 2021 at 22:00

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