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Saturn's apparent magnitude from Uranus is +3.228. Jupiter orbits closer to the sun than Saturn. Can we therefore expect Jupiter’s apparent magnitude from Uranus to be dimmer than Saturn's, or is it in fact brighter?

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    $\begingroup$ In the light of the similar previous questions and their answers: please use the general adivice and strategy given there and /or consult a programme like Stellarium to give you these simple look-up answers. $\endgroup$ Nov 27, 2021 at 14:58
  • $\begingroup$ @planetmaker. I have had a look at that app and I don't understand it. In other words, I don't know how to operate it towards desired goal. $\endgroup$ Nov 27, 2021 at 15:03
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    $\begingroup$ "Saturn's apparent magnitude as watched from Uranus is +3.228\. Is it? I'd think it would vary a lot and not be a fixed number. Where did you get +3.228? $\endgroup$
    – James K
    Nov 27, 2021 at 17:40
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    $\begingroup$ @James K. astronomy.stackexchange.com/questions/47458/… $\endgroup$ Nov 27, 2021 at 21:48

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I started Stellarium on my computer and pressed F6 to bring up the "Location" window.

Then I changed the planet to "Uranus", and marvelled at the view of the many rings and many moons from the planet's "surface"

For convenience I clicked the buttons to remove the ground and the atmosphere. then I found and clicked on Saturn. It had a magnitude of 3.74. I then pressed F5 to get a time window and stepped one month at a time while watching the change in Saturn's brightness. The maximum I could get was +3.55 (in 2042) though it is believable that it could get brighter at a more favourable elongation in it's elliptical orbit. I also noted that as Saturn passes in front of the sun, its magnitude gets much less, well below naked eye.

I then repeated with Jupiter. It has a maximum brightness of +1.55 (in about 2031) but again, it is believable that it would be brighter at a more favourable elongation.

At its brightest, Jupiter is a lot brighter than Saturn when viewed from Uranus.

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  • $\begingroup$ I just downloaded the Stellarium Plus app. Had to pay $14.99 for it. I don’t know how to use it. Could you please guide me through it. $\endgroup$ Nov 27, 2021 at 22:47
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    $\begingroup$ You were robbed. Stellarium is free software for Windows, Mac and Linux. stellarium.org I hope the step by step in the above answer would enable you to check the answer. The use of "F6" and "Window" should have made it clear that this isn't a mobile app. But I've added "on my computer" just in case it wasn't clear. I can't help with some similarly named mobile app. I don't really use a phone. $\endgroup$
    – James K
    Nov 27, 2021 at 22:50
  • $\begingroup$ Ok thx I’ll try that $\endgroup$ Nov 27, 2021 at 22:58
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    $\begingroup$ Got it working! "Magnitude" seems to mean "Apparent Magnitude" since Absolute Magnitude is listed separately. The figures I got was: Uranus - Saturn = +2.77 (2027). Uranus - Jupiter = -0.02 (2021). What was striking was that both Venus (+1.32/49) and the earth (+2.44/59) were brighter than Saturn when viewed from Uranus. Mercury's apparent magnitude was +3.41 (2067). And the dimmest planet - Mars was +5.61 (2033) $\endgroup$ Nov 28, 2021 at 6:04

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