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Saturn's apparent magnitude as watched from Uranus is +3.228. Jupiter's orbit is further in towards the sun. Can we expect its apparent magnitude to be greater than Saturn's, or is it in fact lesser? (Less is brighter in the world of apparent magnitudes apparently)

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    $\begingroup$ In the light of the similar previous questions and their answers: please use the general adivice and strategy given there and /or consult a programme like Stellarium to give you these simple look-up answers. $\endgroup$ Nov 27 '21 at 14:58
  • $\begingroup$ @planetmaker. I have had a look at that app and I don't understand it. In other words, I don't know how to operate it towards desired goal. $\endgroup$ Nov 27 '21 at 15:03
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    $\begingroup$ "Saturn's apparent magnitude as watched from Uranus is +3.228\. Is it? I'd think it would vary a lot and not be a fixed number. Where did you get +3.228? $\endgroup$
    – James K
    Nov 27 '21 at 17:40
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    $\begingroup$ @James K. astronomy.stackexchange.com/questions/47458/… $\endgroup$ Nov 27 '21 at 21:48
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I started Stellarium on my computer and pressed F6 to bring up the "Location" window.

Then I changed the planet to "Uranus", and marvelled at the view of the many rings and many moons from the planet's "surface"

For convenience I clicked the buttons to remove the ground and the atmosphere. then I found and clicked on Saturn. It had a magnitude of 3.74. I then pressed F5 to get a time window and stepped one month at a time while watching the change in Saturn's brightness. The maximum I could get was +3.55 (in 2042) though it is believable that it could get brighter at a more favourable elongation in it's elliptical orbit. I also noted that as Saturn passes in front of the sun, its magnitude gets much less, well below naked eye.

I then repeated with Jupiter. It has a maximum brightness of +1.55 (in about 2031) but again, it is believable that it would be brighter at a more favourable elongation.

At its brightest, Jupiter is a lot brighter than Saturn when viewed from Uranus.

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  • $\begingroup$ I just downloaded the Stellarium Plus app. Had to pay $14.99 for it. I don’t know how to use it. Could you please guide me through it. $\endgroup$ Nov 27 '21 at 22:47
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    $\begingroup$ You were robbed. Stellarium is free software for Windows, Mac and Linux. stellarium.org I hope the step by step in the above answer would enable you to check the answer. The use of "F6" and "Window" should have made it clear that this isn't a mobile app. But I've added "on my computer" just in case it wasn't clear. I can't help with some similarly named mobile app. I don't really use a phone. $\endgroup$
    – James K
    Nov 27 '21 at 22:50
  • $\begingroup$ Ok thx I’ll try that $\endgroup$ Nov 27 '21 at 22:58
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    $\begingroup$ Got it working! "Magnitude" seems to mean "Apparent Magnitude" since Absolute Magnitude is listed separately. The figures I got was: Uranus - Saturn = +2.77 (2027). Uranus - Jupiter = -0.02 (2021). What was striking was that both Venus (+1.32/49) and the earth (+2.44/59) were brighter than Saturn when viewed from Uranus. Mercury's apparent magnitude was +3.41 (2067). And the dimmest planet - Mars was +5.61 (2033) $\endgroup$ Nov 28 '21 at 6:04

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