2
$\begingroup$

Is it possible to detect signal from SII, H$\alpha$, OIII using radio telescope and make the similar images as optic telescope? If no, can we use the different elements to take signal?

What minimal reflector radius do I need to have to do it? Can I use reflector from satellite TV?

$\endgroup$
3
$\begingroup$

Is it possible to detect signal from SII, Hα, OIII using radio telescope and make the similar images as optic telescope? If no, can we use the different elements to take signal?

Radio telescopes, quite sensibly, observe in the radio band (or more usually the microwave band). All the emission signals you mentioned are in the optical band. SII is $671.6\:\text{nm}$, H$\alpha$ is $656.3\:\text{nm}$, and OIII is $500.7\:\text{nm}$. Radio telescopes are not equipped to observe in these wavelengths. If you would like to observe specific emission lines in the radio regime, you will have to find low energy transitions that emit at the long radio wavelengths. Because the energy emission is so low, this usually means energy transitions between rotational or vibrational states of molecules or else transitions between hyperfine states. A well known example is the Hydrogen 21 cm line. Other common radio wavelength emission lines can be found at this resource.

What minimal reflector radius do I need to have to do it? Can I use reflector from satellite TV?

I'm not sure what you're getting at here. The ability to observe in optical wavelengths isn't a function of the size of your reflector. It depends on your reflector's ability to reflect optical wavelengths and then your receiver's ability to receive optical wavelengths (usually this means using a CCD). A satellite TV dish would not be equipped for such an observation.

$\endgroup$
6
  • $\begingroup$ You didn't understood. I mean what can we observe instead of that elements to combine it to picture as R, G and B channel's like hubble do with SII, Ha and OIII $\endgroup$
    – Robotex
    Jan 12 at 13:55
  • $\begingroup$ And the second part about reflector for that elements. For i.e. can I use satTV reflector for detect Hydrogen 21 cm line? $\endgroup$
    – Robotex
    Jan 12 at 13:56
  • $\begingroup$ @Robotex I think I did answer your question. You can't make R, G, B channels, but you can choose wavelengths like the 21 cm line and combine your image into false color images if you want. It's 100% up to you to decide what emission lines you'd like to observe though and how you want to combine the into a color picture. As for your other question, I've also already answered it. A satellite TV dish would not be equipped for such an observation. $\endgroup$
    – zephyr
    Jan 12 at 14:41
  • $\begingroup$ Ok, the first channel is H 21cm. But what can be used for the other channels? Is there only one wavelength for the radiotelescopes? $\endgroup$
    – Robotex
    Jan 12 at 17:32
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ @Robotex As I said, that is 100% up to you. You can choose to observe at any radio wavelength you wish. Feel free to search for some with this resource out of the thousands of common emission lines that exist. $\endgroup$
    – zephyr
    Jan 12 at 19:01

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.