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Imagine we have a stellar cloud sufficiently massive to generate N high mass stars, what is the reason for this scenario not to happen? Because I know that when the jeans instability happens a star is born. So the critical mass (Jean's) associated with this instability as a lower limit is the one which makes it more probable to form low mass stars or that is what I interpret from what I studied. If it not the case, please let me know.

Another thing I have read is that the critical mass is proportional to $1/\sqrt{\rho}$ so when the cloud is collapsing it can fragment in more stars because the density $\rho$ increases during this scenario, I think this is another reason why low mass stars are more common. So my question is, are these things I mentioned the fundamental reasons why more low mass stars are generated? or there is another reason? or is what I said wrong?

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The crucial point here is that the initial large cloud does not have a constant density throughout but contains many random smaller blobs with a higher density. Because of the higher density, these will collapse faster than the whole cloud would. So you end up with a star cluster rather than one supermassive star.

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  • $\begingroup$ This isn't the main reason that fragmentation occurs. $\endgroup$
    – ProfRob
    Jan 19 at 23:56
  • $\begingroup$ @ProfRob One needs density irregularities in the first place for fragmentation to occur $\endgroup$
    – Thomas
    Jan 20 at 20:45
  • $\begingroup$ The correct explanation is here en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jeans_instability The presence of density perturbations is not sufficient to cause fragmentation. There are other conditions that are met in collapsing protostellar clouds. $\endgroup$
    – ProfRob
    Jan 21 at 0:00
  • $\begingroup$ @ProfRob Density irregularities as such may not be sufficient for fragmentation but they are necessary. Without them the giant cloud would just collapse as a whole towards its center. $\endgroup$
    – Thomas
    Jan 21 at 8:28

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