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Although there are lots of examples of atmospheric retrieval techniques being used on exoplanets, and recently brown dwarfs, I can't find any mention of atmospheric retrieval techniques being used on stars. Is this because:

a) My research is bad and there are examples of this?

b) It's not useful as the structure and profile of stars are well known, as well as how to determine parameters e.g. metallicity by UV absorption?

c) Another reason?

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

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    $\begingroup$ I think I’m missing something here, when you say atmosphere retrieval are you referring to just spectroscopy on planets or something a bit more nuanced? If just spectroscopy, then spectroscopy certainly exists on stars and has existed for a very long time. $\endgroup$
    – Justin T
    Commented Feb 17, 2022 at 22:03
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    $\begingroup$ And if you’re referring to finding stellar structure/ temperature profiles/ etc from spectroscopy as is done with planets, then this is done as well for stars, but probe slightly different characteristics since certain broad strokes about the stellar structure have been determined a long time ago through means including spectroscopic methods (convective vs radiative zones, core structure, etc) $\endgroup$
    – Justin T
    Commented Feb 17, 2022 at 22:07
  • $\begingroup$ @JustinT I am referring to using primarily Bayesian techniques to solve the inverse model problem rather than the forward model problem - for example please see here: arxiv.org/abs/1808.04824 It's discussed at length in Rodgers (2000) for atmospheric sounding. $\endgroup$ Commented Feb 18, 2022 at 15:18
  • $\begingroup$ It may just be a case of terminology. I know that in atmospheric science the term 'retrieval' is quite common, but not so in astrophysics. Certainly, in solar physics for instance inverse methods have been used for a long time. See this review paper for instance arxiv.org/abs/1609.08324 To some extent, these 'inverse' methods are just iterated forward methods anyway. $\endgroup$
    – Thomas
    Commented Feb 20, 2022 at 10:27
  • $\begingroup$ @Thomas Thanks for this - it is exactly what I was looking for! $\endgroup$ Commented Feb 20, 2022 at 17:38

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It may just be a case of terminology. I know that in atmospheric science the term 'retrieval' is quite common, but not so much in astrophysics. Certainly, in solar physics for instance inverse methods have been used for a long time. See this review paper for instance https://arxiv.org/abs/1609.08324 . To some extent, these 'inverse' methods are just iterated forward methods anywa

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