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The EHT just announced their great findings about Sgr A*, amongst other cool things they found that we look towards the black hole face on which means that if there is a jet it approximately looks into our direction.

Does this match one of the theories for Fermi bubbles, that they might have formed from the jets of Sgr A* or does the new information about the orientation rules this out?

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  • $\begingroup$ Are we looking towards it or are we seeing a distorted image like in this image from NASA sciencealert.com/… $\endgroup$ May 13 at 9:16
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    $\begingroup$ In doi.org/10.3847/2041-8213/ac6674 they say high inclination models fail, so looking towards us is probable. $\endgroup$
    – astronerd
    May 13 at 9:22
  • $\begingroup$ From that paper "All edge-on (high inclination) models fail the combined set of EHT-only constraints..." so high inclination in this case means edge-on. Well I've learned something new today! Thanks for that, and for linking to that paper. $\endgroup$ May 13 at 10:08

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The video

discusses exactly this question around the 15 minute mark. The newly published results seem to favour an inclination between the spin axis of Sgr A* and the Fermi bubbles of about 60°. Some possible implications of this mismatch:

  • Sgr A* was previously aligned with the Fermi bubbles, but changed orientation since then. For example due to a merger with another galaxy.

  • Fermi bubbles might have been caused by some spherical phenomenon, but we only see them in the less dense parts outside of the galactic disc.

  • Fermi bubbles might have some other origin.

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