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In the calculation of the average of the atomic mass of sun, we should also count the number of the electrons. However, now that the mass of an electron is about 1/2000 of a nucleon, why can 't we only count the number of atomic nucleus and ignore the electrons?

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    $\begingroup$ "In the calculation of the average of the atomic mass of sun, we should also count the number of the electrons. " Says who? Can you show your working? What do you get if you do your calculation with and without electrons? However, it isn't particularly difficult to include the mass of the electrons, so why not? Also I'm not really sure why this average is particularly useful - the composition of the sun isn't uniform - can you explain what you need this value for. That could make the question easier to answer. $\endgroup$
    – James K
    Jun 23 at 5:48
  • $\begingroup$ Do you perhaps mean "the average particle mass", also known as the "mean molecular weight"? If you wish to calculate the average of 1 and 1/2000, you cannot neglect the 1/2000. $\endgroup$
    – pela
    Jun 23 at 19:59

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