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Is there a difference in the escape velocity when leaving the solar system?

a) Vertically (out of planetary plane, in a perpendicular direction to it)

b) Horizontally (in the planetary plane)

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    $\begingroup$ No homework questions. $\endgroup$ Dec 2, 2022 at 13:21
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    $\begingroup$ The answer you got for your previous post also applies here. Don't think Solar system is special because you live here. $\endgroup$ Dec 2, 2022 at 14:47
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    $\begingroup$ Indeed. It's the perfect duplicate of the previous question. $\endgroup$ Dec 2, 2022 at 15:09
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    $\begingroup$ There is quite a difference in mass distributuon between a galaxy and a solar system. E.g. a galaxy's gravitational field is not dominated by a single object near the barycenter. If you think the questions are the same, you should explain why rather than state it as fact. $\endgroup$ Dec 2, 2022 at 17:20
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    $\begingroup$ @uhoh While bible-thumping may be your personal go-to, I think most of the community agrees that lazy, "solve this problem for me"-type questions are not welcome here. You at least should show some valiant effort before typing up a question as, after all, we are not a homework portal for undergrads. $\endgroup$ Dec 4, 2022 at 12:52

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Gravity works in all direction the same, and you cannot shield it. You need the same velocity wrt the barycenter to leave its influence, regardless of direction.

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  • $\begingroup$ Temporary -1 because "Gravity works in all direction the same..." is not the basis of an answer here. "'Escape' means at least asymptotically reaches infinity where only the monopole term applies" is the key here. $\endgroup$
    – uhoh
    Dec 4, 2022 at 3:02

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