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I am trying to understand the influence of black holes and the tilts of solar systems on their axial plane In relation to the plane of their host galaxies.

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  • $\begingroup$ No Black hole can create such peterbutions on the axial tilt, only Gravitational anomalies can do this. $\endgroup$
    – user47732
    Jan 20, 2023 at 13:42
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    $\begingroup$ Albeit concentrated but still, isn’t a black hole a gravitational anomaly? I understand if in close proximity to the event horizon poses a risk of destruction and consumption completely. At a certain distance and position it seems to me that it could have some influence if not physically possibly our perception of a tilt may be plausible. Gravitational forces do seem to cause some visual distortions. Just postulating ideas. $\endgroup$
    – Ashtaras
    Jan 20, 2023 at 13:54
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    $\begingroup$ Thanks for the quick reply!. Blackhole is'nt a gravitational anomaly. Unless the blackhole is some ultramassive blackhole, though our galaxy is chaotic it wouldn't cause much visible difference, Saggitarius A causes less perterbution on the solar system's axial tilt then neighboring stars. Nice thought experiment $\endgroup$
    – user47732
    Jan 20, 2023 at 14:05

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Everything I've read indicates that the orientation of a star system with respect to the galactic plane is pretty much random. It depends on the local angular momentum of the gas cloud from which the star system formed, and that local angular momentum is more or less uncorrelated with the angular momentum of the galaxy as a whole. A black hole is not needed.

I'll add references later, perhaps this weekend. I'll delete this answer if someone beats me to the punch with a well-referenced answer that says the same.

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