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What is this T-shaped constellation? Never seen it before and it’s not on the map. The photo is made from south-west London facing west at 23-15 on 25.02.2023.enter image description here

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    $\begingroup$ That's Orion... $\endgroup$ Feb 26, 2023 at 1:01
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    $\begingroup$ @GregMiller You should make that an answer (better said, the answer). Answers can be short. $\endgroup$ Feb 26, 2023 at 1:42
  • $\begingroup$ what I'd like to know is what exactly that antenna has been pointed at $\endgroup$
    – uhoh
    Feb 26, 2023 at 9:04
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    $\begingroup$ This is a very nice photo and the answers are correct and good. I would be interested in what exactly you describe as "T-shape". Just to satisfy this curiosity: Could edit and ammend a smaller version of the photo where you paint on top of it the T which you saw? It's such a wonderful example of how different people see different shapes when not influenced by what one should see :) $\endgroup$ Feb 26, 2023 at 10:06
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    $\begingroup$ Interesting that I'm so used to seeing Orion, that I can't see the 'T'. $\endgroup$
    – Jim421616
    Feb 26, 2023 at 17:36

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enter image description here

From in-the-sky.org's Planetarium function for London on said date and time, we can see that Orion's belt is about 17° above the horizon in the west-south-west.


@Greg Miller's comment is close:

That's Orion..

But I'll propose a correction, that's a very nice photo of Orion :-)

To prove that, see my snapshot of Orion et al. in this answer to What's the orange star I can see in the sky right now?

The three stars in a row just beloiw the antenna are Orion's Belt and the "straight line" dropping down and slightly to the left from it is Orion's sword.

And the slightly fuzzy blob in the sword is the Orion Nebula


This is a photo of the Orion Nebula taken on the 16th of Janurary 2016 https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:The_Orion_Nebula,_16.01.2016.jpg

above: This is a photo of the Orion Nebula taken on the 16th of Janurary 2016 below: Composite from two images taken with Canon 85mm / 1.8, taken while Orion was nearly overhead in Bali

Composite from two images taken with Canon 85mm / 1.8, taken while Orion was nearly overhead in Bali. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Orion_composite1.jpg

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    $\begingroup$ Envisioning the stars dangling down the middle as a sword is an ancient Greek interpretation. Other civilizations have envisioned those stars as depicting something else, typically a male body part. $\endgroup$ Feb 26, 2023 at 1:53
  • $\begingroup$ @DavidHammen oh... kay... like Uranus this is a reference we're not likely to be using as our "go-to term". $\endgroup$
    – uhoh
    Feb 26, 2023 at 1:58
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    $\begingroup$ Many civilizations considered Orion's belt a huge waist of space. That's why they only gave it three stars. $\endgroup$ Feb 26, 2023 at 2:40
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    $\begingroup$ @GregMiller you made me laugh in public - luckily only a quiet coffee shop and not the library :-) $\endgroup$
    – uhoh
    Feb 26, 2023 at 3:50
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    $\begingroup$ Apparently in Finnish folklore the belt and sword were seen as a scythe (Väinämöisen viikate; the Scythe of Väinämöinen), with the sword as the shaft and the belt as the blade like a reversed 7. $\endgroup$
    – Dronir
    Feb 27, 2023 at 7:51

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