0
$\begingroup$

I have found definitions calling it a stony metiorite, calling it a meteor of silicate, a granite meteorite, or even calling it a metallic rock from space and more. What is the actual definition?

$\endgroup$
5
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Can you please be a bit more specific or verbose?. Does the body of your question relate to the word 'aerolite' in the title of your question? Or how are the things you found related to it? How and where did you find those definitions? What ressources did you check? Show us what you know. This is the internet, links work. 'stony meteorite' and 'metallic rock' certainly don't go well together at the same time. $\endgroup$ Commented May 16, 2023 at 15:05
  • $\begingroup$ It is what is the actual definition or the word which is surprisingly unclear? $\endgroup$
    – Starship
    Commented May 16, 2023 at 15:13
  • $\begingroup$ I don't know. Is that your question? What did you find? How does that not form a uniform view? Show us your search. Link your results. Honestly, I think I found an answer within 5 minutes of using the search engine of my choice. But if I ask about it, I should at least show my search and results when asking, stating why I have doubts about it, stressing the discrepancies raising the doubts, so others don't have to do the same nor do tell you what you already know. $\endgroup$ Commented May 16, 2023 at 15:24
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Is that your question? Yes it is. What did you find? I say that in the question. How does that not form a uniform view? Read the question. $\endgroup$
    – Starship
    Commented May 16, 2023 at 15:40
  • 4
    $\begingroup$ @Starshipisgoforlaunch I understand your question; "What is the actual definition of 'aerolite'?" I think, but others might not. To (greatly) improve your question and its reception, can you include specific quotes of at least two conflicting definitions that you've found? Basically "Source A says it's an xyz, but source B says it must be a wxy, is there a single, best definition used by the scientific community?" Make sure to include links or citations for A and B. Thanks! $\endgroup$
    – uhoh
    Commented May 16, 2023 at 20:59

2 Answers 2

5
$\begingroup$

An aerolite is, exactly, a dated term from protoscience practitioners. The term has been completely superseded by modern workers, in modern times, using modern data. The term dates back to the time when meteorites- as “rocks from the sky”- were still in doubt by many.

That you still encountered the term “aerolite” in 2023 is a tribute to record preservation and good curation practices, not to the word being useful or relevant in any way to us modern practitioners. You can regard the word as dutifully as you regard rule by nobility, using ships-of-the-line, to fight Barbary pirates. All date to the same period.

$\endgroup$
3
$\begingroup$

From an etymological point of view, aerolite/aerolith derives from Greek "aéros", air, and "lithos", stone, so it literally means a "stone from the air". If you take this definition to the letter, you can rule out iron meteorites, as they are not stony.

$\endgroup$

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .