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I understand that the Meeus book is a classic in astronomical calculations. I've read through many chapters of it now and while the content is great, it'd be nice to have discussion based on more recent context.

Is there a "modern equivalent" to this classic book?

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    $\begingroup$ If there is one, I would also like to know about it! I think it remains the only work of its kind, though. Updated quantities have been published here and there, but not in a single work. For example, for the Moon’s orbit, one can refer to Éphémérides Lunaires Parisiennes; for the planets, to VSOP 2013; etc. $\endgroup$ Jun 13, 2023 at 6:11
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    $\begingroup$ @AtmosphericPrisonEscape Supply was disrupted when Willmann-Bell went out of business. Sky Publishing now sells it for $36. Copyright endures several decades after publication or author's death depending on country. $\endgroup$
    – Mike G
    Jun 13, 2023 at 19:05
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    $\begingroup$ He is still alive. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean_Meeus Astronomical Algorithms was first published in 1991. $\endgroup$
    – PM 2Ring
    Jun 13, 2023 at 20:06
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    $\begingroup$ @MikeG That's probably good enough to be converted to an answer, along with the detail that the author is still alive. $\endgroup$ Jun 13, 2023 at 20:23
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    $\begingroup$ The closest thing to an updated version is the Explanatory Supplement to the Astronomical Almanac, 3rd ed, but it is not aimed at amateurs. $\endgroup$ Jun 13, 2023 at 20:42

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The methods described in Jean Meeus's book are still valid, and accurate enough for the needs of most amateur and many professional astronomers. The science of positional astronomy doesn't change so rapidly that a book published in 1991 would be out of date only 30 years later. Even methods developed in the 19th century, such as Besselian elements of eclipses, are still useful in the 21st century.

Having said that, better solar system ephemerides do appear from time to time, such as the newer ones from IMCCE which supersede VSOP87. In my own code (written in Java and available at GitHub: https://github.com/DavidHarper/astrojava) I prefer to use the JPL Development Ephemeris representations of the orbits of the Moon and planets, because they are computationally easier to use than the IMCCE representations. However, I don't criticise Meeus (or anyone else) for choosing VSOP87.

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