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In this video, I see that for hours, it seems that the flow keeps going from the 11h direction to the Sun's surface - while there looks like nothing is coming to the top of the loop to provide a source for the flow. Where does it get all that material?

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    $\begingroup$ SDO spacecraft observes the Sun by several cameras, with specific bandpass each (all in extreme ultraviolet). The material should be in corresponding temperature range to be seen by the selected camera. Hotter or or colder - and the camera will not see it. $\endgroup$
    – Heopps
    Jun 19, 2023 at 10:37
  • $\begingroup$ That's quite probable! So do you think the invisible material is hotter or colder? In the video, it starts quite faint at the top and becomes more saturated the further it falls. $\endgroup$
    – longtry
    Jun 20, 2023 at 6:27

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Good question. The material comes from the Sun, is ejected into the loop quickly, and slowly rains back down.

In the linked video at timestamp 0:11 you see the complete Sun and the flare erupting on the right rim of it. More close-up at 0:28 you see the loop already faintly and much smaller. It is then brightening up quickly and expanding. That is material erupting from the Sun and filling the magnetic arc(s). Subsequently you see that most of the ejected material slowly rains back down, mostly along the lines of the magnetic field while some small part will continue to expand and might arrive here (if that was direction to Earth) and trigger some nice polar lights.

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  • $\begingroup$ So, between 0:38 and 0:45 is all the time it needs to loft all the material up? Because after that I already see stuff going down and apparently nothing up. It feels surreal to look at streams materialized out of seemingly nowhere and keeps pouring down. $\endgroup$
    – longtry
    Jun 16, 2023 at 4:13

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