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Which do we receive more energy from, the CMB or starlight? (Not including the sun of course.)

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    $\begingroup$ I take it that you want to exclude the light from one particular nearby Type-G star, the only one easily visible during the day? $\endgroup$
    – James K
    Commented Jul 16, 2023 at 10:37
  • $\begingroup$ On the ground, or from space? The atmosphere is more transparent to visible light than to microwaves. (And of course it also blocks a lot of the UV from stars). $\endgroup$
    – PM 2Ring
    Commented Jul 16, 2023 at 15:17
  • $\begingroup$ Eg, from rfcafe.com/references/electrical/atm-absorption.htm This chart shows zenith attenuation rfcafe.com/references/electrical/images2/… The CMB peak is ~160 GHz. $\endgroup$
    – PM 2Ring
    Commented Jul 16, 2023 at 15:39
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    $\begingroup$ An answer here physics.stackexchange.com/questions/46838/… says that the CMB is about twice as bright as the stars $\endgroup$
    – James K
    Commented Jul 16, 2023 at 21:17
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    $\begingroup$ The energy of the CMB dominates over starlight in the "cosmic background" — i.e. outside of the Milky Way — by an order of magnitude or more, as clarified in this answer on physics.SE. But if you mean here, on Earth, then starlight probably dominates. $\endgroup$
    – pela
    Commented Jul 17, 2023 at 14:49

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