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Total solar eclipses are extremely rare. It's of great coincidence that we live in a period where the Moon is just the right distance (as with time it's receding away) to have the same apparent size in sky as the Sun on Earth. My question is, does any other planet or moon or any other minor body also has one body (with which it is gravitationally bound, making the process recurrent) which is of the same apparent size as the apparent size of Sun in the sky. Note that I'm just asking for possibility of totality: occultation, transits and partial/annular eclipses don't count. Although if the annular is as good ours, then I'm willing to give it a pass. Just the ring should be thin enough!

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    $\begingroup$ Several moons cause solar eclipses, but not with the close size match. Here's a recent answer I wrote on eclipses on Neptune: astronomy.stackexchange.com/a/55620/16685 OTOH, viewing a solar eclipse from an ice or gas giant would be a bit tricky. Where would you stand? ;) $\endgroup$
    – PM 2Ring
    Feb 10 at 17:45
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    $\begingroup$ That's a great answer. I was looking something similar to this. And, I don't have to care about standing, I will just use Stellarium lol. $\endgroup$
    – peakcipher
    Feb 10 at 21:03
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    $\begingroup$ @pekcipher. Whey do you think that the matching size is what makes a total eclipse? If the angular size of the moon is equal to or greater than that of the sun the eclipse will be total. There are many more solar system objects whose angular sizes as seen from their companion worlds are much smaller or much larger than that of the Sun at that distance, than there are ones with exactly the same angular size. $\endgroup$ Feb 10 at 22:59
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    $\begingroup$ @M.A.G If the angular diameter of the eclipsing body is much larger than the Sun's, you probably won't see the corona. Of course, at the distance of Uranus or Neptune, the angular diameters of the Sun & corona are pretty small. Also, the diamond ring effect & Baily's beads are most spectacular when the sizes match. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baily%27s_beads $\endgroup$
    – PM 2Ring
    Feb 11 at 0:36
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    $\begingroup$ @PM2Ring You won't see all of the corona at once, but immediately after the eclipsing body covers the photosphere, you'll see the part of the corona that isn't eclipsed. $\endgroup$
    – John Doty
    Feb 11 at 1:26

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Many (most?) moons, including our own, experience eclipses by their parent planet. Moons can eclipse the Sun as seen by other moons. Compiling a full catalog would be a bit of research.

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    $\begingroup$ Yes, but I was looking for a documented body from where totality could be observed. $\endgroup$
    – peakcipher
    Feb 10 at 21:04
  • $\begingroup$ @peakcipher depending on your definition of totality, you could observe it from the Moon. You'd still see the sunlight refracted by the Earth's atmosphere though. $\endgroup$
    – Ruslan
    Feb 11 at 5:33

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