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My earlier question about predicted potentially observable events Has a gravitational microlensing event ever been predicted? If so, has it been observed? is limited to microlensing.

Now I have just learned in CNN's March 19, 2024 Explosive star event will create once-in-a-lifetime sight in the sky. Here’s how to see it that recurrent Nova T Coronae Borealis is expected to brighten in the next few months from roughly +11 to +2 magnitude. CNN says that NASAUniverse's tweets will issue updates if you read it, but I am social media-averse.

Are there automated (and hopefully free) systems I can subscribe to that will send me an old-fashioned email, or maybe an SMS text message when the Nova becomes visible?

Potentially related:

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    $\begingroup$ Spaceweather.com has an alert system, mostly for solar events. But the highest plan level has "custom" alerts. You can ask them about it. $\endgroup$ Mar 23 at 0:02
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    $\begingroup$ Have a look at astronomerstelegram.org $\endgroup$ Mar 23 at 12:06
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    $\begingroup$ Here's a reddit thread of the same question: reddit.com/r/space/comments/1bkwq7f/… $\endgroup$ Mar 23 at 15:05
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    $\begingroup$ I'm from the UK, It's always cloudy. . . Of course, this event is not actually spectacular on the night. All you will see is one extra star in the sky, it won't look fundamentally different from any of the others. So, if it were cloudy, I wouldn't be travelling to see it. But see the answer to the linked question . astronomy.stackexchange.com/questions/57248 AAVSO do tracking (but not alerts, as far as I can tell) $\endgroup$
    – James K
    Mar 25 at 6:00
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    $\begingroup$ @JamesK I know; my understated weather comment was tongue-in-cheek :-) I've never (knowingly) seen a nova. And while it will likely be visually indistinguishable from a star, it will be intellectually and spiritually exciting for me to see it and know what it is. And I know some graduate students who will (at least pretend, for my benefit, to) find it exciting as well. $\endgroup$
    – uhoh
    Mar 26 at 1:46

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You can create a (free) account with the AAVSO, and then subscribe to the "Time Sensitive Alerts" forum. The forum will then email you any reports of brightening of T CrB that variable star observers make. You can browse the forum (without creating an account) too. See the T CrB Time Sensitive Alerts Forum thread. It is possible to subscribe to the thread, or to the full forum (in which case you'll get emails about other "time sensitive" changes, including other novae.

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  • $\begingroup$ I'm giving it a try now, thanks! $\endgroup$
    – uhoh
    Apr 1 at 23:14

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