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I thought I knew the answer to this up until today I read an article by an eye doctor who said one should keep the eclipse glasses on even during totality. Now I am somewhat confused. Can anyone explain why the sudden caution? I hope he is wrong but I saw this in two separate sources.

I was planning to wear my eclipse glasses until it is pitch black and then match the time to the expected time as a double check for safety. I would also only look for about 10 seconds so I don't get the edge of the moon sliding away from the edge of the sun. But still now I am wondering if this is really safe.

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The risk is that if you take your glasses off too soon, or if you're staring at the Sun at the moment it reappears, you might suffer eye damage. The tiny fraction of the Sun that's visible isn't bright enough to trigger your protective blink reflex, but it's still bright enough to cause damage.

During the core of totality, looking at the eclipse with the naked eye is safe.

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    $\begingroup$ Thank you Mark. Now I just pray the sun will shine during my totality in the afternoon. There is a 50/50 chance of clouds right now but looking better by the hour that the sun will break through. $\endgroup$
    – Sedumjoy
    Apr 6 at 14:11
  • $\begingroup$ Some people say to keep glasses on during totality so just to be safe I will do that but am very thankful for your response. $\endgroup$
    – Sedumjoy
    Apr 8 at 16:24
  • $\begingroup$ You will not see a thing (not one thing) with your eclipse glasses on during totality. You will have a hard time seeing anything with your sunglasses on during totality. It gets very, very dark. The Sun's corona is a lot less brighter than is a full moon, and that is all that will be providing light. $\endgroup$ Apr 9 at 13:57

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