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Could be the magnetic field of every single atom in a mass combined with other magnetic fields of other atoms, result in a gravitational pull? I will explain what do I mean by that question. I know everything on the universe that has a mass, consists of atoms. Each atom have weak magnetic field, resulting in attraction of other atoms. Even we humans are built out of atoms. So, could be that combined magnetic field of every single atom in that mass to be a result of that attracting force?

Are my thoughts have a logic, or do I miss something important to know? I appreciate any kind of correction. Thank you very much.

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    $\begingroup$ Hi Παύλος, welcome to Stack Exchange! While your questions are good, here are a few recommendations: Firstly, on this site you're only supposed to ask one questions at a time. Secondly, make sure your questions haven't been answered previously. Thirdly, while it's nice to know your background, perhaps consider putting these things in your bio instead, making it easier to quickly see what your question is about. (fourthly, gravity and electromagnetic forces are two entirely different things). $\endgroup$
    – pela
    May 15 at 14:37
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    $\begingroup$ Can you please explain that? Why they are different? Thanks BTW for the corrections. I'll have it in my mind next time. $\endgroup$ May 15 at 17:50
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    $\begingroup$ I can't explain why they are different, but I can explain how: For instance, gravity is always attractive, while electromagnetism can both attract and repel. Also, gravity is $10^{36}$ times weaker than electromagnetism. $\endgroup$
    – pela
    May 15 at 19:43
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    $\begingroup$ @ΠαύλοςΜωυσίδης There are four fundamental forces in the universe: Electromagnetism is mediated by the exchange of photons; weak nuclear force (mostly responsible for radioactive decay and some quark behaviors) is mediated by W and Z bosons; strong nuclear force (responsible for quarks binding together into protons and neutrons and such), mediated by gluons; and gravity, which pulls bulk matter together and MAY be mediated by gravitons, but we aren't sure and gravity may actually be a completely different thing from the other three forces. $\endgroup$ 2 days ago
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    $\begingroup$ Basically, if gravity and magnetism were the same thing, there would be a lot less concern about how it works, and a lot of particle physicists would be a lot less frustrated. $\endgroup$ 2 days ago

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Gravity is something different from magnetism.

Magnets have a dipole field, their force decays as $r^{-3}$. Gravity is a monopole field, its force decays as $r^{-2}$. This difference is easily measurable.

All this said, electric and magnetic forces are easily differentiated from gravity, e.g. by their influence on spectra which is wildly different than gravitational reddening.

If the combination of magnetic fields generated gravity as suggested in the question: why doesn't a strong magnet act as gravitation source?

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    $\begingroup$ Yeah.. Good question. Thanks for the correction. But.. Our planet and our sun acts as a huge magnets. Isn't that magnetic force the reason why gravity exists? I understand your point where do you bring this, but I really want to know where am I mistaken. Magnets are small amount of mass, and have not that much of mass concentration to cause gravity. My logic can be wrong, and I completely understand it, but I want to know why it is wrong? Thank you very much. $\endgroup$ 2 days ago
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    $\begingroup$ @ΠαύλοςΜωυσίδης, it appears you are making the connection between large masses and magnets. We also observe planets that do not appear to have magnetic fields. Mars is one such example. Both Earth and Mars have a LOT of atoms, but only one planet has a magnetic field. $\endgroup$ 2 days ago
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    $\begingroup$ Wikipedia has some good information: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnetic_field_of_Mars $\endgroup$ yesterday
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    $\begingroup$ See also en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnetosphere $\endgroup$ yesterday
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    $\begingroup$ There are so many things I really do not understand... Like what the hell with that gravity? Is it really such a thing that bothers most of the people? Like is the gravity that hard to understand? I'm amazed. $\endgroup$ yesterday

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