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When I open the 5 degree data of Green Coronal Emission line from this, I get a weird table which is not simple like the one for Coronal Index. I am only providing the table for 1939.

http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/stp/space-weather/solar-data/solar-indices/solar_corona/5-degree-data/data/1939/1939

I can't provide the link for the formats used due to the restriction (max of 2 links until I have a rep above 10) but it's in the folder for 5 degree data.

I searched extensively connecting the formats (like I4, I2) to the datasheet but couldn't even scratch the surface of it.

I want the data for green coronal intensities and positional degrees in that respective year but can't find from this table. How do I find them?

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The format of the files seems to be described in this file, the content of which I've included below.

The annual files (1939-1993) contain the green coronal emission line
530.3 nm observations.  The coronal intensities are given in millionths
of intensity of the solar disk (coronal units) and converted to the
photometrical scale of Lomnicky Stit Station at a height of 40" above
the solar limb.

Several stations were used in this database with Lomnicky Peak being the
primary station since 1965.

Reference:  Rybansky, et al, 1994, Solar Physics 152, p 153-159.

Data format:

 COLUMN  FORMAT   DESCRITPION
  1-  2    I2     Year, last two digits
  3-  4    I2     Month
  5-  6    I2     Day
  7-  8    2X     Blank
      9    I1     Coronal station code:
                  0 - Interpolated data
                  1 - Lomnicky Stit
                  2 - Sacramento Peak
                  3 - Norikura
                  4 - Kislovodsk
                  5 - Pic Du Midi
                  6 - Wenselstein
                  7 - Arosa
                  8 - Kanzelhohe
 10- 13    I4     Time of the observation in hours (or zero)
 14- 17    I4     Time of the observation in minutes (or zero)
 18-305  72(I4)   Coronal intensities (72 values) from 0 degrees to 355
                  degrees of position angle in increments of 5 degrees.

Using the first row data as an example...

DATE        SC  H   M   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46  47  48  49  50  51  52  53  54  55  56  57  58  59  60  61  62  63  64  65  66  67  68  69  70  71  72
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
19390101    0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   3   3   3   8   15  22  34  41  52  46  40  52  68  59  49  35  17  8   3   3   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   3   3   6   8   12  19  31  40  50  47  43  38  53  73  71  65  56  47  38  24  17  12  6   0   0   0   0   0   0

19390101 is the date (1939-01-01). The first zero (Marked as SC) is the station code, the second the recorded hour, and the third the recorded minute (H/M). Most of this is 0 due to being interpolated data.

After this information, there are 72 remaining columns (numbered 1-72 above), which represents collected data consolidated in groups of 5 degrees, presumably starting at 0.

Given the amount of interpolation of old data the value may be questionable, but newer data appear to be more complete.

The data format might be a little overwhelming to work with, but you can organize it in excel quite easily - paste it in and each line break will form a row, then use the text-to-column function to break each data into its own column.

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