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I am just wondering whether any man-made satellites are currently orbiting our Moon. If there is one, would I be able to see it using my telescope?

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The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter is still up there. At a compact 2000kg, it's likely too small to see via earth based telescope. Mission Page

I think the Chinese orbiter is back on earth now, but there may be others.

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    $\begingroup$ At a compact 2000kg, it's likely too small to see via earth based telescope. That's an understatement. The Hubble wouldn't be able to see it, let alone a backyard telescope. See hubblesite.org/reference_desk/faq/… . $\endgroup$ Feb 25, 2015 at 22:18
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    $\begingroup$ @David Hammen your link only deals with he ability of Hubble to resolve small objects, which is relevant for artefacts on the Lunar surface, but a satellite orbiting the Moon will at least at times be a bright spot against a dark background (albietly close to a bright object) sperated from the lunar surface by many times the resolution limit of Hubble. $\endgroup$ Feb 26, 2015 at 7:50
  • $\begingroup$ The upper stage of Chang'e 5T is still maneuvering in cis-lunar space, but has left Lunar orbit. $\endgroup$
    – LocalFluff
    Feb 26, 2015 at 11:17
  • $\begingroup$ Hubble on XKCD What if? $\endgroup$
    – Mithoron
    Feb 26, 2015 at 11:39
  • $\begingroup$ @LocalFluff many people now think that it will hit the Moon next week en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chang%27e_5-T1#Third_stage_disposal but there is still some uncertainty if the identification is correct or not. $\endgroup$
    – uhoh
    Feb 26, 2022 at 2:40
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Except for LRO, an upper stage of a payload destined to lunar orbit, might stay in lunar orbit for a while, and be much larger than the payload itself. But according to this answer it would be short lived without station keeping.

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The Space SE question

discusses the ISRO satellite orbiting the moon Since 8 November 2008

These days I'm still waiting for some answer to

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    $\begingroup$ The chandrayaan 1 was last tracked on 2019. And it is said to still orbiting the moon. I will link sources $\endgroup$ Feb 26, 2022 at 4:58
  • $\begingroup$ @KavinIshwaran that's great to know, looking forward to it! $\endgroup$
    – uhoh
    Feb 26, 2022 at 13:54
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    $\begingroup$ @KavinIshwaran I think it's possible they just made a mistake in the article. It's written in 2019 and says "On July 2 last year, the team pointed Goldstone and Green Bank at a location about 160 kilometres above the Moon's north pole and waited... " suggesting it was done on July 2 2018. But Phys.org says "So, on July 2, 2016, the team pointed Goldstone and Green Bank at a location about 100 miles (160 kilometers) above the moon's north pole and waited..." $\endgroup$
    – uhoh
    Feb 26, 2022 at 16:24
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    $\begingroup$ I think there is an error in the article I linked. Recently I was reading an article about Chandrayaan 3, Even in that it is specified that Chandrayaan 1 was tracked on August of 2019. I looked for that Article but couldnt find it, I will look for a confusion free artlicle soon :) $\endgroup$ Feb 27, 2022 at 4:01
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    $\begingroup$ @KavinIshwaran that's great, thank you for your persistence! $\endgroup$
    – uhoh
    Feb 27, 2022 at 4:02

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