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Questions tagged [big-bang-theory]

Questions regarding the currently prevalent cosmological model for the origin of the universe.

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1 answer
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What is the history of the average pressure, density, and temperature of the matter in the universe over time?

This question is inspired by this more specific question where Cerelic wanted to know if conditions were suitable for liquid water to exist during an epoch when the characteristic temperature of the ...
Mark Foskey's user avatar
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4 votes
0 answers
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Expanded element (and molecule) abundance graph?

There is the "classical" nucleosynthesis timeline chart where the $\log ({\rm mass \,fraction})$ is plotted as a function of $\log(t)$ where $t$ is in seconds after the big bang, looking e.g....
B--rian's user avatar
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4 votes
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From what distances do the atoms in you come from?

If the atoms of a human come from stars, comets, nebulas and magnetrons, then what is the greatest distance that two atoms of a human can possibly have been away from each other previously? Perhaps ...
bandybabboon's user avatar
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4 votes
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Does the cosmological principle apply to the entire universe?

Some cosmological models assume that the universe is isotropic and homogeneous and that is also flat and infinite. If the universe is infinite now it was infinite immediately after the big bang. If ...
UFO's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
316 views

Redshift distance proportionality at high Z and need for "mighty mouse" galaxies?

Allegedly supported by some evidence from the new James Webb space telescope physicist Eric Lerner has written an article that have garnered some attention. He writes that: "Put another way, the ...
Agerhell's user avatar
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2 votes
0 answers
69 views

Cosmic background radiation - what frequency tells us?

I understand that cosmic microwave background radiation is remnant of the universe after 380,000y of the origin. To me, this radiation is still a wave which has a microwave frequency and I also ...
Giorgi Lagidze's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
77 views

How do we know or predict which particles were present before Big Bang Nucleosynthesis occurred?

I'm reading Carroll and Ostlie's "An Introduction to Modern Astrophysics". In the BBN section, they describe that the universe contains a mixture of photons, electron-positron pairs, and ...
Astroturf's user avatar
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2 votes
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Is there a theory about a collision between a shrinking universe and a new expanding universe?

I recently read a post on a discussion board about the creation of our current universe that stated, and I quote: [T]he shrinkage activity of the old universe and the new Big Bang expansion ...
Halfway Dillitante's user avatar
2 votes
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54 views

How the observed deuterium abundance constrains big bang nucleosynthesis?

I know deuterium can be used as a good tracer to constrain the big bang nucleosynthesis. But can anyone tell me the in details how this is actually done?
Arpan Das's user avatar
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2 votes
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290 views

How do we know the big bang expanded space and there wasn't a pre-existing volume for the universe to expand into?

Whenever we hear an explanation about the big bang, it is always phrased in such a way that it was an explosion which used some kind of pressure to expanded the universe out. I wonder, however, would ...
Scottie's user avatar
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1 vote
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Does cosmic inflation spawn from empty space, or vice versa?

In the eternal inflation model supported by Sean Carroll and others, the basic premise is that inflation is continuous in places across an infinite cosmos, and that bubble universes (like our own) are ...
DouglasPhillips's user avatar
1 vote
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74 views

How did cosmic inflation even occur?

I wanted to ask this question that which inflation model shall i believe? Following below will be MY UNDERSTANDING (MAY NOT BE CORRECT) OF IT: I read "A Brief History of Time" and in chapter ...
Aveer's user avatar
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How did the Universe climb out of its own Big Bang black hole?

The Big Bang started as a singularity. That means small. All the matter in the universe was in a volume smaller than its own Schwarzchild radius. The universe was inside a black hole. At present, the ...
Woody's user avatar
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1 vote
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How can scientists deduce the number of types of neutrinos, or 'effective number', from Planck satellite data?

Is it related to the way they deduce the Hubble constant from Planck data? Would more types of oscillating and mixing neutrinos mean faster or slower expansion of the universe? Would a fourth mass ...
Kurt Hikes's user avatar
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1 vote
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Math for the "universe in a black hole" hypothesis?

There are various pop-science article entitled Are we living in a Black Hole? or Did A Black Hole Give Birth To Our Universe? which say things like There’s a lot to like about the idea that there’s a ...
B--rian's user avatar
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1 vote
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Could the duration of some gamma ray bursts be information from outside our universe?

Could we be in a system where a large mass explodes dispersing matter in all directions until gravity pulls it together with matter from other explosions until the maximum mass limit is reached, ...
reginald Bengtson's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
71 views

in current models of the Big Bang, what happens to the products of baryon annihilation?

In current thinking about the Big Bang, the baryogenesis phase involves CP/CPT symmetry violation. There is an excess (says Wikipedia) of perhaps 1 in $10^{10}$ baryons over antibaryons, the majority ...
Stilez's user avatar
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1 vote
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Expansion of space - how do we end up with an unobservable region?

I've just been answering a question on this issue,in physics SE,and realised that my answer conceals a point I don't myself understand. I understand that The expansion of metric isn't affected by ...
Stilez's user avatar
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139 views

Does the other side of the Big Bang factor into JWST observations?

Our (roughly) 13.6 billion light year view to the point of origin (big bang) is just along a radial axis. Assuming most matter ejected in a (roughly) spherical pattern, the diameter of the universe is ...
TonyG's user avatar
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Why is it assumed that the universe started out with a size equal to the Planck length?

What if the Planck length is the distance between particles when the universe was very small . For a spherical ball of 10^ 78 protons that would give the universe a radius of 10^26 X 10^-35 = 10^-9 ...
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Accuracy of the Inflation theory

In the Inflation theory, it said that the Inflationary epoch has happened $10^{-32} \,\mathrm{s}$ after the Big Bang, and I cannot find anything related to how this number was calculated and how ...
Jack the Ranger's user avatar
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0 answers
38 views

Must all galaxies in a galaxy cluster have the same expansion rate?

If we observe a distant galaxies cluster where all galaxies travel with the same speed away from us, except for one galaxy whose speed is significantly lower than of the neighboring galaxies. Does ...
Yos's user avatar
  • 131
-1 votes
0 answers
62 views

Is there a good Big Bang visualization (similar level of precision as the one they did for a proton)?

I watched a video visualising the proton. Is there something similar for the Big Bang? So far I've seen only those, where the bright explosion kind of happens (and dies out) at a single spot, instead ...
Andrey Lebedenko's user avatar