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Questions tagged [big-bang-theory]

Questions regarding the currently prevalent cosmological model for the origin of the universe.

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How does inflation justify the nonexistence of magnetic monopoles?

It is said that inflation justifies that magnetic monopoles don't exist. Can anyone explain how inflation theory explains the non existence of magnetic monopoles?
Gauti's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
623 views

What is beyond the observable universe? [closed]

What is beyond the edge of the observable universe? Scientists say that the Big Bang is the cause of all creation in the known universe, but it would seem the bang must have happened in the center of ...
PL_Pathum's user avatar
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4 votes
3 answers
1k views

How can the universe be expanding faster than speed of light? [duplicate]

So the story goes like this: A long time ago, 13.799±0.021 billion years to be exact, something happened. It was a big bang, loud explosion and universe came to existence. It grew and grew, and now ...
Farhan's user avatar
  • 701
0 votes
1 answer
296 views

Why do we we even exist? [closed]

It came to my mind one day that why does this universe even exist and why do we even exist and like we are enclosed in the so called atmosphere and a floating rock in space called the Earth, so is ...
Sayan's user avatar
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3 votes
2 answers
315 views

Is there a way to know how the magnetic field was at the very beginning of our universe?

I recently read that Gamma-ray bursts are catastrophic events, related to the explosion of massive stars 50 times the size of our sun. If you ranked all the explosions in the universe based on ...
J. Chomel's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
258 views

Was Milky Way formed after Sagittarius A Explosion?

Is it possible that most galaxies (and our galaxy) were formed from leftovers of supernova explosions? In order to have a black hole 4,000,000 x solar mass the initial mass of the star should have ...
Antons Voitov's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
2k views

Why did the big bang produce a low entropy universe?

In order for the universe to be as it is, containing stars and galaxies, it is a requirement that the early universe was at a relatively low entropy state. Why did the big bang produce this low ...
Mike H's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
444 views

Does a White hole lies behind a Black hole?

While reading about a White holes, I stumbled upon a question "Where does the matter emitted by a White hole come from?" There seems to be 2 possible candidates: It was the matter engulfed by a ...
pooja somani's user avatar
-2 votes
2 answers
155 views

How does the earth not continue accelerating? [closed]

I'm not scientist at all so the answer might be obvious but I was pondering about the big bang. I started wondering how is it possible that the earth had to accelerate at some point in history to the ...
LetTheWritersWrite's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
134 views

From where so much of energy would have arrived as was required for such a giant universe to have come into existence? [closed]

If we convert the mass of all the stars and all the planets which must be weighing trillions and trillions of tonnes by the equation E = m.c^2 it gets converted into an unimaginable amount of energy. ...
S C Sawhney's user avatar
6 votes
2 answers
512 views

Could the big bang have created super massive black holes?

I understand that space was compressed to a single point and that during the big bang all points within that expanded away from each other at phenomenal speeds. I also have heard that during this the ...
Terran's user avatar
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7 votes
1 answer
4k views

Amount of energy of the Big Bang

What is the currently accepted estimated range of the amount of energy of the Big Bang event? In joules at some estimated size, so a temperature may be calculated. For context, I wonder if the ...
Bohemian's user avatar
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3 votes
2 answers
163 views

Collision of Galaxies

According to the big bang theory, the universe started from a small intial point and is essentially expanding. However, my question is that if the universe is expanding how is it possible for galactic ...
NJH's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
501 views

Which constellation would appear to revolve around Denab,Vega or Thuban when axis of the earth would point toward them?

We have been calling the star by looking at which we can make out the direction of the North Pole the North Star. This was the only method at the disposal of the sailors during the days when they did ...
S C Sawhney's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
473 views

What existed before the big bang [closed]

What existed before the big bang? What all thing are there inside big bang object ?.
Sreepathy Sp's user avatar
8 votes
3 answers
316 views

What made cooler temperatures suitable for atom formation?

I have read in relation to Big Bang theory that after 300,000 years of big Bang temperature was reduced to 4500 Kelvin and this gave rise to Atomic matter.So,my question is why reduction in ...
Kartik Watwani's user avatar
9 votes
2 answers
208 views

How Good Are the Upper Limits on Heavy Elements?

There are between 90 and 254 stable nuclei all the way up to element number 82. In discussions and graphs about big bang nucleosynthesis nothing above lithium is even mentioned. It's a pretty safe bet ...
Sean Lake's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
790 views

Did uncertainty principle triggered big bang? [closed]

So i want to know why world changed from the empty state ( no materials, energy and ...) from to the it's staring state in the big bang shape? based of this answer's to this question: big-bang-thoery-...
Soheil Paper's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
223 views

(Thought experiment) if we put a huge mirror into space, could we see back in time to the big bang? [duplicate]

This is an addition to this question which is closed: By putting a mirror in space, would we be able to see into the past? Imagine there is a supernova a hundred years ago. Lots of people see it but ...
thatsagoal's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
1k views

Redshift quantization

A full disclosure to begin with: I'm a PhD student in mathematics and while I understand most of standard cosmological-astronomical terms and I've followed a one semester course on cosmology, I don't ...
Dac0's user avatar
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31 votes
1 answer
7k views

Why didn't the Big Bang produce heavier elements?

Shortly after the Big Bang, temperatures cooled from the Planck temperature. Once temperatures lowered to 116 gigakelvins, nucleosynthesis took place and helium, lithium and trace amounts of other ...
Sir Cumference's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
135 views

How could visible light be in pitch-black? Can it be? [closed]

How could visible light be in pitch-black? Can it be?
Purple Rain Kim's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
152 views

On gravitational wave radiation and arrangement of galaxies post- big bang

Orbits of planets and stars decay due to gravitational wave radiation. An elliptical orbit would become more circular with time. This is especially observed well in binary systems. Taking the example ...
Spoilt Milk's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
557 views

Cosmic microwave background radiation: why did it take so long to get here?

I understand that the universe after the big bang was a super dense cloud of elementary particles, and because of this high density was "not transparent" to light. Then, roughly 400.000 years (380....
user3555654's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
337 views

What could be past the particle horizon?

Forgive any kind of "dumb" question I may ask as this is a new interest of mine and I know it's purely hypothetical. If one were able to surpass light speed and the expansion of space to go beyond ...
CS2016's user avatar
  • 113
2 votes
1 answer
229 views

How can we use hypervelocity stars to determine the origins of the Universe?

I was reading this article finding evidence of Universe's origin, which describes that in 1 trillion years we may lose the ability to determine how the universe was created. The answer seems to be ...
El Bromista's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
191 views

Standard Big Bang model and space curvature

Why it is said that in standard Big Bang model space curvature grows with time when the Universe expands? My intuition is that it should be the opposite. I saw this in a book talking about the ...
velut luna's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
508 views

Future redshifting and effect on the 'pitch' of CMB radiation

After discovering this question exploring the sound of a blackbody, I started wondering about the sound of the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation from the Big Bang, specifically what the current ...
Alec's user avatar
  • 123
2 votes
2 answers
128 views

What is the reason the Chinese want to measure the <30Mhz radiation behind the moon?

On the Earth it is difficult to detect radiation below 30MHz from space due to our atmosphere. But why do they want to measure this radiation behind the moon? It has something to do with the big bang, ...
Marijn 's user avatar
  • 1,826
-1 votes
1 answer
214 views

Why is the CMB not simply travelling parallel to us? [closed]

When we look to the distant farthest reaches of the universe we see light that was emitted at the big bang 14 billion years ago. But the universe was tiny back then so that light, which is only ...
it's a hire car baby's user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
587 views

How could universe inflate itself out of the very dense and curved early spacetime? Could it happen in a black hole too?

Wasn't spacetime as much curved as a black hole directly after Big Bang, because mass was so densly packed? Wasn't everything like an event horizon and how could things expand across it? Could ...
LocalFluff's user avatar
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2 votes
2 answers
193 views

Was time different before the great inflation?

In time different during the first second after Big Bang than it is now? Inflation had a dramatic effect on space, and spacetime is one thing. Was the properties of time affected too? Curved spacetime ...
LocalFluff's user avatar
  • 11.4k
1 vote
2 answers
365 views

How is it possible that the CMB approaches the earth from all directions?

I presume that the photons from the CMB approach the earth from all directions, otherwise we couldn't detect them with a picture where it is present everywhere in the universe with a tiny anisotropy. ...
Marijn 's user avatar
  • 1,826
1 vote
1 answer
404 views

Is nucleosynthesis responsible for the expansion of the universe?

Is it just a coincidence that the two major expansionary periods occur close to periods of nucleosynthesis? Big Bang nucleosynthesis occurred very close to the inflationary period. Supernova and ...
Justin Waters's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
523 views

Why Milky Way and Andromeda are being drawn together if there was 'Big Bang'?

Scientists used to use following reasoning: most galaxies are red-shifted $\implies$ there was a 'Big Bang' Why this is being considered valid since not every galaxy has such property?
Waldemar Gałęzinowski's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
274 views

Gravitational Waves and the Big bang

The Ligo website says "Detecting the relic gravitational waves from the Big Bang will allow us to see farther back into the history of the Universe than ever before." I find this puzzling. How can a ...
W Stannard's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
1k views

When was visible light for the first time created?

"A few minutes into the expansion, when the temperature was about a billion (one thousand million) kelvin and the density was about that of air, neutrons combined with protons to form the universe's ...
Marijn 's user avatar
  • 1,826
4 votes
1 answer
211 views

Is it possible to get a glimpse of the Big Bang through gravitation waves?

I read in an article announcing the detection of gravitational waves by LIGO that it will be possible to detect them from the Big Bang. Is this true?
signsgeek's user avatar
  • 357
3 votes
1 answer
898 views

What was "space" like before big bang?

I have a simple question which I think about often but have no answer. If The Big Bang is true, than if the whole space was just a point 14 billion years ago, then what was around that point, some ...
Bhaskar Vashishth's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
188 views

The big bang and our expanding universe

The Hubble telescope can see the light from the big bang.My question is if our universe is expanding that would make everything that's in front of our solar system be in the future? And also can ...
Abel's user avatar
  • 21
0 votes
1 answer
241 views

Second Big Bang [duplicate]

Just say you are immortal and will live forever. Since the universe is claimed to be unstable, what would happen after it ends? Would all of the universe's mass just fly back into another compressed ...
Tyler Richardson's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
159 views

When I read that a system is located x light years away, why is there no direction?

Well, I just read an article about a galaxy with two black holes, and it stated that the galaxy is 1 billion light-years away. Why is there no direction given? If the Big Bang happened, and things are ...
KingsInnerSoul's user avatar
2 votes
3 answers
520 views

Question about space-time

In the Big Bang model of the Universe, every observable thing is thought to have expanded very abruptly from a point of infinite density and zero volume. However, the problem with this assertion is ...
Private Name's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
177 views

Center of the universe

Big bang is not an explosion, but an expansion of space and time. Universe had almost infinite density... wait a moment. If it had ALMOST infinite density, it had a certain volume, and thus, space ...
Felix L.'s user avatar
  • 193
1 vote
1 answer
404 views

How do we know that the Universe is still expanding now?

Yes, I know that most galaxies have a red shift and that means they are moving away from us. The problem is that the farthest galaxies are 13.8 billion light years away. That means that the info is ...
Miroslav Popov's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
345 views

A universal reference point [duplicate]

I would like to use a system of co-ordinates (x,y,z,t) based on a specific well known point. My original choice (the center of the universe in the big bang theory, Bigbang0), was wrong as the universe ...
LOIS 16192's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
903 views

Strength of gravity during the big bang?

I was watching a documentary on the big bang, one of the astronomers said that initially the four fundamental forces were combined as one, they then emerged to become: The strong and weak nuclear ...
michael's user avatar
  • 31
1 vote
1 answer
149 views

Is the time lapse considered when estimating the age of the universe?

We say that our universe is 13.7 billion years ago. During the big bang, it doubled at least 90 times in trillionth of a second (as given here), and other topological statements. The question is ...
Shashwat's user avatar
  • 113
12 votes
1 answer
335 views

Is any consensus forming on the solution to the "Lithium Problem"?

The "Lithium Problem" relates to the fact very-low-metallicity stars appear to have a Li/H ratio approximately one third of what would be expected. The ratio should be the same as the prediction from ...
Eubie Drew's user avatar
  • 1,080
0 votes
2 answers
228 views

Could we estimate the age of the universe based on the planar property of the Solar System?

The Big Bang scattered planets and stars everywhere in three dimensions. But after billion years of moving and interacting with each others through gravity, planets moved on the same plane. Given ...
Thomas's user avatar
  • 119