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Questions tagged [gravitational-waves]

Waves in spacetime formed by the acceleration of massive bodies. A passing wave causes spacetime to be stretched and squashed by a very small amount. Typically we can only detect the most energic gravitational events such as black hole mergers.

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How far away was the binary black hole that produced GW170729?

GW170729 was gravitational wave signal's detected by the Virgo and LIGO detectors. I read the following in a news report: Known as GW170729, in accordance with the date of its discovery (in US ...
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Expansion and Gravity

If space is undergoing accelerated expansion then regions of space are becoming inaccessible to us even at light speed. If gravity is bounded by light speed then inaccessible regions of space no ...
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What can I learn from, or notice in the LIGO Orrery video?

The Ars Technica article Physicists detected gravitational waves from four new black-hole mergers notes that This brings the total number of events detected by LIGO and Virgo to 11. It also has a ...
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Does a gravitational wave loses energy over distance?

How does a gravitational wave travel over vast distances without losing its energy? Could they go on forever as long as the Space? Thank you
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What does “GPU-accelerated butterfly matched filtering over dense bank of time-symmetric chirp-like templates” mean? (GW170817)

A new analysis of gravitational wave (and other data) from GW170817 on 2017-Aug-17 has been published, strongly suggesting that the merger of two neutron stars resulted in a large, rapidly rotating ...
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What changes are being made to VIRGO and LIGO (if any)?

Gravitational wave detectors VIRGO and LIGO are currently down for some updates, slated to be completed sometime early next year (they hope). What exactly are they doing? I hadn't heard it was down ...
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Do gravitational waves have distinct bands or parameters from which a source redshift can be inferred? [duplicate]

In optical astronomy, much (most?) electromagnetic radiation is emitted at well defined frequencies, and this can be used to infer a redshift for the source, and hence its recessional velocity, age, ...
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What does gravity-wave noise resemble locally?

Now that we know that gravity waves exist, we can consider to design a new unit of measurement, i.e. deciGravs (from dB) and we can predict what the backround noise of dG's is locally and in space. ...
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Would LIGO Detect Head-On Collision?

Assume two black holes collide head-on. In other words, they were not orbiting one another before the collision. I know this is unlikely. Further assume that their sizes and distance from Earth are ...
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GW from merging of neutron stars and black holes

If it had been detected gravitational waves from merging of black holes (BH), and neutron stars (NS), why there are no detection of black holes merging with neutron stars? Why a BH-NS merging should ...
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Could gravitational waves near merging black holes collapse to a black hole themselves?

I have understood that merging black holes emit considerable amount of their mass as gravitational waves (up to 5-10%). Based on what I have understood from gravitational waves, the closer black holes ...
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Why is frequency different for gravitational waves coming from SMBHs vs small compact binaries?

Why do gravitational waves emitted by supermassive black holes binaries have low-frequency range (~10$^{-9}$ - 10$^{-2}$ Hz) than those emitted by stellar mass compact binaries (~10$^{-4}$ - 10$^2$ ...
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What does the word “compact” mean in astronomy/astrophysics?

I have seen countless times the adjective "compact" in astronomy, e.g. compact stars, compact binaries, etc. I would like to know, what exactly is this supposed to mean? From this source, I am led to ...
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What do the acronyms in “AT 2017 gfo” mean?

About 11 hours after the detection of GW170817 by Ligo/Virgo and the quickly succeeding detected GRB170817, a transient afterglow in the optical-nIR frequency appeared which showed many signs of r-...
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Items at the Event Horizon vs. colliding Black Holes

Items reaching a Black Hole's Event Horizon seem to be frozen in time from the point of view of an outside observer. On the other hand, Black Holes collide and merge, in finite steps, producing ...
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The size of the radius of the event horizon of a black hole created by the merger of a black hole binary system

Let's assume that you had a black hole binary system and everything said here is possible. Their large masses would lead to a large emission of gravitational waves. The loss of orbital energy and ...
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Maximum disturbance to space time of gravitational waves, and will this affect humans? [duplicate]

Do we have a theory that can tell us how much change gravitational waves can make to space time. If it is infinite then I think any time we can see biggest change in space time and how much could it ...
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Can two detectors for gravitational waves be combined into a very long baseline interferometer?

While detectors for gravitational waves are interferometers themselves, the question here is about an increase in resolution resulting from two or more detectors far away from each other.
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Do mixed type remnant collisions produce anything interesting?

The recent detection of a binary neutron star inspiraling and colliding raises an interesting question in my mind. Type Ia supernovae are believed to be caused by white dwarf/regular star pairs and/or ...
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“Who saw” the binary neutron star merger first? What was the sequence of events? (GRB/GW170817)

I'm trying to read Multi-messenger Observations of a Binary Neutron Star Merger the "cast of thousands" OPEN Access ApJ letter 848:L12 (59pp), 2017 October 20 https://doi.org/10.3847/2041-8213/aa91c9 ...
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What is the detection threshold of gravitational waves for LIGO?

Since now two neutron stars have been detected merging via gravitational waves, I was wondering what is the current detection threshold that the LIGO detectors can achieve. Considering that the first ...
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Are binary neutron star mergers needed to explain the abundance of gold?

The NPR News item Astronomers Strike Gravitational Gold In Colliding Neutron Stars mentions and quotes "Daniel Kasen, a theoretical astrophysicist at the University of California, Berkeley:" He ...
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Why is the discovery of merging neutron stars important?

I'm fairly certain people here will have heard about it, already, but apparently, two supernova leftovers clashed some 130 million years ago and some billion billion kilometres away ... What I haven'...
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What would it feel like to be orbiting near a merging black hole?

The recent 4th discovery of gravitational waves where the black hole masses were 31 and 25 times the mass of the sun, and they released 3 solar masses of energy as gravitational waves, made me wonder ...
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How did Earth get here before gravitational waves?

If GWs propagate at near the speed of light, how did Earth (and its constituent elements) arrive at its current location billions of years before the GW arrived here (or light from distant stars for ...
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Will the detection of colliding neutron stars by LIGO help answer the question of where heavy elements came form?

I have read about and heard about the theory that most of the heavy elements we have here on Earth came from colliding neutron stars rather than by way of supernovae. I'm not sure how strong this ...
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Is there an official list of objects in the sky?

I would like to know how many known quasars there are in the Universe as well as x-ray binary black holes (not Neutron stars) but I don't seem to be able to. I also want to know how many black holes ...
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From where does the energy for gravitational waves come from?

As far as I understand, in the events detected by LIGO, about 4% of the total mass of merging binary black holes was converted to gravitational waves. Where does this energy come from, i.e. what ...
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Observation of Gravitional waves by LIGO from binary black hole merger

I read the paper "Observation of Gravitational Waves from a Binary Black Hole Merger" https://physics.aps.org/featured-article-pdf/10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.061102 I tried to understand all the graphs ...
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How does the Gamma Ray Burst that occurred when 2 black holes merged compare to other GRB's?

A Gamma Ray Burst was detected 0.4 seconds after the gravitational wave event, GW150914, caused by a black hole merger, and it was in the same part of the sky. It is uncertain whether that Gamma Ray ...
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On gravitational wave radiation and arrangement of galaxies post- big bang

Orbits of planets and stars decay due to gravitational wave radiation. An elliptical orbit would become more circular with time. This is especially observed well in binary systems. Taking the example ...
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Which of the following statements about gravitational waves are true? [closed]

a) The emission of gravitational waves from merging black holes is predicted by Einstein's general theory of relativity. b) The first direct detection of gravitational waves, announced in 2016, came ...
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Multi-messenger astronomy: what is the potential of simultaneous detection of gravitational waves and neutrinos from a supernova?

Thanks to the efforts of the aLIGO team, gravitational wave astronomy is a reality. At the same time, neutrino detectors like Hyperkamiokande are becoming much more sensitive. My question is: what ...
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In which two constellations, were the two gravitational wave events of 2016?

As best as is known, what is the latest thinking on in the issue of, in which constellation was GW150914, and in which constellation was GW151226? (That is to say, within the large uncertainty, as ...
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Energy deposition in planet Earth due to gravitational waves

The gravitational wave detected by the LIGO observatory acted on planet Earth streching and shrinking it a little bit. I assume that not all of this action was fully elastic and that some energy of ...
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Is there evidence for the speed of gravity? [duplicate]

Is it an assumption that the speed of propagation of gravitational waves is exactly the same as the speed of light? If the speed of gravity is only slightly less than the speed of light, the effect ...
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Do supernovae produce powerful gravitational waves?

I would think that the amount of energy produced by one supernova is much more than a pair of colliding black holes, no? Wouldn't that much material and energy output from the explosion generate a ...
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What is the speed of gravitational waves ? [duplicate]

I read that two huge black holes collided or merged and so it created gravitational waves billion years ago , So now we are able to detect it & detected it. So what is the speed of gravitational ...
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Could information be transmitted from inside a black hole using gravitational waves?

Could you use gravitational waves to communicate from inside the event horizon of a black hole to someone who was outside?
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When are gravitational waves emitted during a merger of black holes?

When black holes are merging, and emitting gravitational waves, are we seeing those waves start when the event horizons are merging, or when the singularities are merging?
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Would gravitational waves be subject to external gravitational perturbations?

Given that the gravitational wave detected by LIGO was a very weak echo of a very distant event, could it have been "deviated" and distorted on its way here by a sufficiently massive black hole in ...
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Giant variation of the proposed eLISA mission using reflectors on Earth and the Moon possible?

I was thinking about the proposed ESA mission eLISA, which is essentially a space version of the LIGO experiment, and it occurred to me that trailing three satellites behind the Earth's orbit seemed ...
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How close would merging black holes have to be to feel gravitational waves? [duplicate]

Recently LIGO discovered gravitational waves caused by two black holes that were orbiting each other, and then collapsed into one black hole. A few months later, we find out that this actually happens ...
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Techniques for locating origin of gravitational waves

The gravity wave detections (GW150914 and GW151226) have both been ambiguous in their exact position, the LIGO papers (GW150914 and GW151226) give no precise information about the location of the ...
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How large could gravitational waves get and what effect could they have on us?

The waves detected by LIGO were basically subatomic distortions of space-time. Could there be much greater distortions closer to a source. Would they become perceptible to a human in any way and what ...
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LIGO gravitational wave chirp signal frequency

This question is about the LIGO gravitational wave signals' frequency. The signals start from about 35 Hz to peak at about 250 Hz, giving evidence of gravitational waves. The question is about the ...
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Can the expansion of spacetime be directly measured with laser interferometry (like GW can)

LIGO has a mind boggling sensitivity. What would it take to directly measure the expansion of spacetime, along the laser beam? I suppose it could be done at interplanetary scale.
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My supernovae question [duplicate]

I understand the collapse of a star during a supernova, as the outward pressure cannot compete with the gravitational field. Is it conceivable, that a relaxation of the space-time curvature is what ...
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Gravitational field released during supernovae

During the collapse of a star at the commencement of supernovae, the intense pressures force fusion and fission to create the heavier elements and release vast amounts of energy. As this energy/mass ...
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Gravitational Waves and the Big bang

The Ligo website says "Detecting the relic gravitational waves from the Big Bang will allow us to see farther back into the history of the Universe than ever before." I find this puzzling. How can a ...