Questions tagged [supernova]

Questions regarding stars which increase suddenly in energy output due to an explosion which ejected much of its mass.

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What's the official process for confirming then naming supernovae (e.g. Requiem and Encore)?

I saw this NASA Webb Telescope tweet: Supernova 2: Galactic Boogaloo In 2016, @NASAHubble saw a supernova named Requiem in a distant galaxy. Now Webb has found a second supernova named Encore — ...
uhoh's user avatar
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21 votes
4 answers
6k views

What would happen if a small black hole fell into a star?

Let's say you created a cannon that can shoot small black holes and you shoot it at some star. Would the star just turn into a black hole silently? Or rather first destabilize and produce a last ...
Filip Sondej's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
195 views

Betelgeuse, placing light bulb so that its apparent brightness is similar to that of Betelgeuse; wavelength where it shines brightest?

The giant star Betelgeuse will develop into a supernova in the future. After this event, his remains will be far too dark to be observed from Earth. In order to maintain the view of the starry sky, it ...
mathgirl752's user avatar
9 votes
1 answer
974 views

Why did it take so long for SN1987A to reach peak brightness?

The light from SN1987A first reached us on February 23, 1987, and its brightness peaked in mid May, almost 3 months later. However, every source that I can find states that it normally only takes a ...
blademan9999's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
78 views

What would the collapse of a white dwarf to a neutron star look it

It’s hypothesised that some white dwarves, when raised in mass above the Chandrasekhar limit, will instead of producing a type 1A supernova, will instead collapse into a Neutron star. What would this ...
blademan9999's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
30 views

Differentiating supernova types with light curves

as an introductory activity for my work on transients, I am studying the light curves of different supernovae. It appears that Type-I supernovae have a more pronounced maximum than Type-II supernovae. ...
Ambica Govind's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
97 views

3rd brightest ever object in the sky

What’s the 3rd brightest ever recorded object in the sky? For example Venus is normally the 3rd brightest object in the sky. However there have been the occasional comet or Supernova that have ...
blademan9999's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
82 views

Measuring Expansion Rate of Crab Nebula with Radio Spectrum Scan

I am a high school student who is into radio astronomy, and I have the opportunity to use Green Bank’s 20m radio telescope for a practice research project. I would like to use my observations to very ...
Myra's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
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How did the Cassiopeia A Supernova go unobserved?

The Cassiopeia A was caused by a Supernova estimated to have taken place around the late 17th century. The Remnant's declination means that it would be Circumpolar for anyone north of 30N, and it's ...
blademan9999's user avatar
5 votes
0 answers
149 views

If a Milky Way supernova were to happen, how long would it take for astronomers to be notified?

If a Supernova were to happen in the Milky Way, how long would it take for astronomers to be notified? How long would it take for the people running the gravitational wave and neutrino detectors to ...
blademan9999's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
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Could we detect neutrinos from a supernova in Andromeda?

Could we detect neutrinos from a supernova in Andromeda? Are our neutrino detectors sensitive enough to do so? They detected 13 neutrinos from SN1987A, which was 186,000 light years away, but our ...
blademan9999's user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
575 views

Intuitive connection between the periods of oscillation of Betelgeuse and the elemental concentrations at its core? (Betelgeuse; Saio et al. (2023))

Preamble (yes it's long, but it's part of this question's premise, so need to spell it out) Dr. Becky's recent video New study claims Betelgeuse supernova IMMINENT (decades not centuries!) | Night Sky ...
uhoh's user avatar
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1 answer
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How do they see BOTH "anomalously cool with a significant mid-IR excess" rather than one or the other? (SN 2023ixf progenitor)

The abstract of the arXiv preprint SN 2023ixf in Messier 101: A Variable Red Supergiant as the Progenitor Candidate to a Type II Supernova (itself recently "discovered" in the observatory) ...
uhoh's user avatar
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4 votes
1 answer
509 views

Has the new type II supernova SN 2023ixf's subtype been determined yet, and is a tentative light curve possible? Is it still getting brighter?

Wikipedia's article on SN 2023ixf begins: SN 2023ixf is a type II (core collapse) supernova located in the Pinwheel Galaxy (M101). It was first observed on May 19, 2023 by Koichi Itagaki and ...
uhoh's user avatar
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1 answer
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When dark energy became significant 6 billion years after the Big Bang was there anything else of significance going on in the universe?

I read that a lot of supernovas appeared at this time but were other major events or phenomenon occurring? I ask this in case there could be some physical process helping dark energy to strengthen or ...
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1 vote
3 answers
106 views

Does the Drake equation consider how far a planet must be from gamma ray bursters, black holes supernovae etc for life to survive?

Can we use these dangerous phenomena to predict where life can't exist?
user avatar
-3 votes
1 answer
77 views

Can the distribution of Al28 across the Earth tell us if the solar system formed from a gas cloud that collapsed itself or by a supernova explosion?

A single supernova could have collapsed a gas cloud and left Aluminium 28 on one side of the Earth . If there were many supernovae in all directions that gradually sent material to Earth then the ...
user avatar
14 votes
1 answer
2k views

Could it be possible to detect planets from stars that went supernova through the resulting nebula shape?

It ocurred me, if a star with at least one planetary companion undergoes a nova or supernova, we shoud expect the debris to be deflected to some degree, on exit. To ilustrate it, first let's take the ...
ksousa's user avatar
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2 votes
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Which value of the apparent magnitude do I use from a Supernova light curve

I am trying to get the distance modulus from a light curve of a supernova and obviously the apparent magnitude changes with time. Not only that but there are so many filters with different mags. So my ...
Abdullah's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
97 views

Supernova remnant spectral lines

I have some trouble to find which spectral lines are the ones in this SNR N49 fitted spectrum. They are at 1.3 keV, 1.9keV, 2.5keV, 3.2keV, 3.95keV and maybe at 0.65keV and 6.8keV (approximately). ...
martín canullán's user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
31 views

Supernova remnant and ejecta "bullet"

I'm making an X-ray analysis of the source SNR N49. It has a magnetar inside of it that is emitting strongly in Soft ([0.2-1.2] keV), Medium ([1.2-2.5] keV), and Hard ([2.5-8.0] keV) bands. I was ...
martín canullán's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
89 views

How to obtain luminosity distance from a light curve

I have some light curve data of a SN Ia from which I want to find the luminosity distance $D_L$. How can I do it mathematically? I'll then try to implement the answer using Python.
Abdullah's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
650 views

How does the Chandrasekhar limit relate to the ignition of carbon in white dwarf stars?

Why carbon in white dwarfs ignites (deflagrate, detonate) at the Chandrasekhar limit? The limit relates stability of the star made of degenerate electron Fermi gas to the white dwarf mass without a ...
Leos Ondra's user avatar
  • 1,055
0 votes
1 answer
70 views

How do remnants of supernova have a magnetic field which cause the insane speed of cosmic rays?

If a star undergoes a supernova explosion, how does it retain its magnetic field to excite the moving particles to near speed of light velocities as stated in observations of NASA?
Naveen V's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
119 views

After a Type Ia supernova explosion, what becomes of the degenerate matter?

A white dwarf below 1.44 solar mass in a binary system may accrete mass from its companion. If its core reaches the temperature for carbon fusion during this process, the white dwarf may reignite in a ...
Mys_721tx's user avatar
  • 133
3 votes
0 answers
102 views

What would be the effect of WR104 if it was at the distance of Alpha Centauri and pointed at us?

If WR104 was at the distance of Alpha Centauri and its pole pointed at us when it went off what effect would it have? How badly would Earth be scorched? If we were sitting right on the cannon’s mouth, ...
Mark Besser's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
25 views

Where can I get data on supernovae captured both by the Hubble and an earth telescope?

I want to compare data on supernovae that are both captured by the Hubble telescope and at least by one earthly telescope. The problem - where can I get this data?
buja's user avatar
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1 vote
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Are there any experiments or observations indicating that the Hubble flow can influence AGNs, quasars and galactic winds (outflows)?

Galactic winds (or outflows) are produced by AGNs (Active Galactic Nuclei), quasars, supernovas...etc which basically eject matter usually in form of waves or spheres, sometimes even arriving to the ...
vengaq's user avatar
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3 votes
0 answers
54 views

Gamma ray bursts and global cooling

I watched the latest video of kurzgesagt channel, which is regarding supernova/gamma ray bursts, and its effects on earth. In the video he explains how gamma ray bursts or supernovas affect our earth. ...
Kshitij Kumar's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
99 views

How do I determine the Luminosity with a half-life decay?

I know there is a proportionality between the luminosity and $\frac{dN}{dt}$, but I am not sure why they are proportional and why there is a need for an initial mass to compute the luminosity if the ...
Casper's user avatar
  • 41
2 votes
1 answer
72 views

How are the products of stellar nucleosynthesis sorted as found in planets?

Stellar nucleosynthesis is responsible for creating the elements heavier than lithium (except perhaps some of the heaviest that might result from neutron star collisions). Eventually, the star goes ...
Moshe Feder's user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
77 views

Are there any binary red supergiants?

I wonder if we ever have identified or observed a pair of binary stars (red supergiants). And I also wonder what would happen if they exploded, (theoretically) as we haven’t observed it. Also, would ...
schrodingerscat's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
63 views

How to interpret illumination in "pulsar cannonball" image

This beautiful image (from APOD) looks like the trail of the ejected pulsar is illuminating a ball of gas and dust. My eye sees patches of light and shadow, but sometimes images can be deceptive. What ...
Mark Foskey's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
137 views

If a supernova explodes all it's comets into space, can they reach a big number of star systems?

If there's DNA life that arises on a warm planet 2 billion years after the big bang, and meteorite collisions on the planet propagate DNA unicellular organisms into millions of icy rocks orbiting the ...
bandybabboon's user avatar
  • 4,242
6 votes
1 answer
193 views

How does metallicity reduce the likelihood of black hole formation?

Large stars collapse and if they are large enough form black holes. But the likelihood reduces with metallicity. What mechanism facilitates this? I believe it has something to do with opacity and ...
TheJeran's user avatar
  • 163
8 votes
1 answer
327 views

Do pop III stars undergo supernova or direct collapse?

Population III stars were the first stars to form. They are hypothesised as being very massive, i.e., > 100 M$_{\odot}$. My question regards how do these stars end their lives? An old orthodoxy for ...
Daddy Kropotkin's user avatar
28 votes
2 answers
5k views

When stars explode after running out of fuel, why are new stars born from the remnants?

I'm not a physicist or have a very good physics background but I've often wondered why there are new stars that are born in the nebula which was created after the parent star has exploded. As I ...
artas2357's user avatar
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4 votes
1 answer
260 views

Acronyms in astrophysics: is there a place that collects them all anywhere on the internet? And what does PSN mean on the TNS server?

Acronyms in astrophysics: is there a place that collects them all anywhere on the internet? And what does PSN mean on the TNS server? Is it "possible supernova" or "pulsar" ...
strange_octopi's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
96 views

Do supernova remnant nebula re-collapse into a star?

We know that nebula sometimes collapse into stars. The particles are attracted to the joint gravitational center of the whole nebula. One type of nebula is a supernova remnant nebula. Unlike a normal ...
cowlinator's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
76 views

What criteria determines whether stars are supernova type II candidates?

I want to find supernova candidates by using the Gaia catalog in 300 parsec (near Earth). I though they must be red super giants so they are cooler than 4100 K and more luminous than 104 solar ...
Aegean's user avatar
  • 109
2 votes
4 answers
2k views

Should we fear Wolf-Rayet WR-104?

I've read on Quora about Wolf-Rayet binary star WR-104, which is thought to be a precursor to a supernova explosion with two accompannying gamma ray bursts. It looks as if the rays will travel in our ...
Felicia's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
43 views

Which parameters of stars could show they about to undergo a supernova explosion?

I need to seek stars in our galaxy about to undergo a SN from catalogues. I can find stars in our galaxy by setting parallax to a certain value. However, I don't know how to find a parameter which ...
Aegean's user avatar
  • 109
-1 votes
1 answer
150 views

Wouldn't the 1054 supernova have temporarily enlightened the Earth like the Sun?

The peak luminosity of all type Ia supernovae is 1.60×1036 Watts. If we see a star go supernova from earth, and we observe its intensity to be 1.0 W/m2. The intensity of the Sun is about 6.33x107 W/m2....
Felicia's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
634 views

When did our neutrino detectors become sensitive enough to detect supernovas in the core of the Milky Way?

When did our neutrino detectors become sensitive enough to be able to detect supernovas occurring in the Core of the Milky Way galaxy? I know the answer is well before 1987, because we detected the ...
blademan9999's user avatar
5 votes
0 answers
118 views

When's the most recent time that we could have missed a supernova?

I know that if a supernova were to happen in the galactic Core, the dust there would prevent the visible light from it from reaching us, so if one were to have occurred there in say 1900, we wouldn't ...
blademan9999's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
489 views

How bright would Betelgeuse's supernova appear?

Popular science articles suggest that when Betelgeuse goes supernova, for some days it would appear as bright as the full moon. But I have no intuition about a celestial point source that bright. ...
Camille Goudeseune's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
58 views

What happens if supernova undergoes in tightly close multi stars system

I do wonder in a tight or close orbital binary stars or multi stars system, if one stars undergoes supernova and that blast can lead another stars in the system to become supernova, too? Is there ...
Aung Satt's user avatar
  • 165
6 votes
1 answer
171 views

Do “neutrino supernovae” exist?

Core collapse supernovae release most of their energy in the form of neutrinos. About 1% of the neutrinos are absorbed by the thick outer envelope which powers a spectacular supernova explosion. Core ...
哲煜黄's user avatar
  • 285
1 vote
0 answers
38 views

When will be the next visible Supernova? [duplicate]

I tried to estimate the average time between Supernovas. Here is my amateur attempt: For a Supernova to be seen to the naked eye it should be, I believe, in our Galaxy. (even if not, lets assume that)...
d_e's user avatar
  • 1,667
12 votes
2 answers
1k views

Why haven’t we observed supernova events of the hypothetical population III stars?

It’s said that we haven’t observed any population III stars because these stars are too far away, which makes them too dim to observe via small diameter space telescopes. Their light is also extremely ...
哲煜黄's user avatar
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