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Questions tagged [supernova]

Questions regarding stars which increase suddenly in energy output due to an explosion which ejected much of its mass.

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What does it mean 'black holes is created when center of a very massive star collapses in upon itself'?

I read many times that black holes is created when center of a very massive star collapses in upon itself but what does it mean ? Does weight of center of massive star increase so much that itself can'...
Rahul Rabhadiya's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
2k views

Why does fusing iron in a stellar core use more energy than it releases [duplicate]

I know larger stars can fuse heavier and heavier elements up to iron where it stops because fusing iron requires more energy than it releases, causing a collapse and supernova. Why does fusing iron ...
Jeff Cohen's user avatar
9 votes
1 answer
1k views

Why do type Ia supernovas produce more iron than type II

My course book on astronomy states the following. Older stars seem have higher oxygen abundances than iron. Explanation is that back in the days when these older stars were being formed type II ...
Stijn D'hondt's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
236 views

Can you recommend a book about big bang nucleosynthesis and chemical abundances?

I am interested in learning about big bang nucleosynthesis, nuclear fusion up to iron in stellar cores and beyond iron in supernovas, and into the lithium problem (galactic abundance anomoly for ...
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26 votes
2 answers
6k views

Why do stars explode?

I always hear the narrator of documentaries say that a star explodes because it ran out of fuel. Usually things explode when they have too much fuel, not when they run out of fuel. Please explain...
Lorry Laurence mcLarry's user avatar
3 votes
3 answers
473 views

What exactly is it that is being magnified 50 times in this gravitational lensing observation?

In the Los Angeles Times news item Scientists get a rare view of a type Ia supernova magnified 50 times what exactly is magnified 50 times? This supernova is really very far away. Is it somehow ...
uhoh's user avatar
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2 votes
2 answers
179 views

Why do neutrinos take time to scatter?

After a supernova neutrinos get released by electron capture,and they escape in a flood. My guess is because they have tiny masses and get momentum from momentum conservation. However, the huge ...
kingW3's user avatar
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8 votes
1 answer
437 views

Do all massive stars explode?

I've read a few articles written in $2008$ that some stars which have enough mass just collapse into black holes without a supernova, is this proven?
kingW3's user avatar
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13 votes
4 answers
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Will Sirius B start accreting from A and become a supernova type Ia?

Sirius B is a massive white dwarf of 1 Solar mass, orbiting at about 25 AU distance from the 2 Solar mass Sirius A. As it evolves and expands, will the A star start shedding matter to the white dwarf, ...
LocalFluff's user avatar
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5 votes
1 answer
815 views

Have I just observed a supernova?

First of all, I'm from Syria. In Syria we have 70% of the night without electricity. So I love hanging out at this period of time in the night, looking up just as Prof. Stephen Hawking said to the sky,...
user3779823's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
127 views

white-dwarf merge in binaries

Two white dwarfs with a total mass $>1.4\:M_{\odot}$ merge. It may trigger a type Ia SN explosion. How about the three cases below? Two low mass WDs merge, total mass $<1.4\:M_{\odot}$. A low ...
questionhang's user avatar
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2 votes
2 answers
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Are the compact objects in supernova remnants isolated neutron stars?

It seems all the central compact objects correlated with supernova remnant(SNRs) are isolated, not in binaries, right? I find only one exception. A source is claimed to be a compact binary which ...
questionhang's user avatar
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5 votes
2 answers
339 views

How do supernova explosions reconcile with light speed constraints?

I have learned about the various types of supernovae, and both Types Ib and II involve the extremely rapid compaction or explosion of a star's core. How does the "information" that (respectively) the ...
Dunaril's user avatar
  • 153
3 votes
1 answer
309 views

What is 'non-detection' of a Supernova?

This may have a simple answer but I can't find it. I've come across this term in a paper I was reading, (Walmswell and Elridge, 2011) which mentions 'non-detection' of Supernovae, and while I can ...
Gurfuffle's user avatar
  • 133
22 votes
1 answer
593 views

Multi-messenger astronomy: what is the potential of simultaneous detection of gravitational waves and neutrinos from a supernova?

Thanks to the efforts of the aLIGO team, gravitational wave astronomy is a reality. At the same time, neutrino detectors like Hyperkamiokande are becoming much more sensitive. My question is: what ...
ProfRob's user avatar
  • 155k
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1 answer
124 views

Convert MJD date range to number of days elapsed in IDL

Hopefully I'm in the appropriate section as my question is mainly about coding, but it's for astronomy. Right now I'm trying to figure out how I can take a range of MJD values and convert them into ...
cdav1601's user avatar
34 votes
4 answers
6k views

Are there observable changes in a star about to become supernova, minutes or hours before the explosion?

I am writing a science fiction novel, where a ship is stranded in a single star system (a red supergiant). One of the plot points is the star becoming supernova in several hours, so the characters ...
Alfonso de Terán's user avatar
6 votes
3 answers
2k views

Do supernovae produce powerful gravitational waves?

I would think that the amount of energy produced by one supernova is much more than a pair of colliding black holes, no? Wouldn't that much material and energy output from the explosion generate a ...
user6760's user avatar
  • 2,501
2 votes
2 answers
794 views

On the lack of observational records by European astronomers of the 1054 guest star

This question relates to the Crab nebula, the Crab Pulsar and the known concurrent supernovae event as recorded by Chinese astronomers in 1054. I'm wondering, I'm looking at the history of the ...
MichaelJRoberts's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
167 views

Can a Y dwarf star undergo a supernova?

Y dwarf stars have sub-zero temperatures, so I became curious how a star like these dies out and if is could go supernova.
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6 votes
1 answer
759 views

What are the possible solutions to the Red Supergiant problem?

I have recently come across this so called "Red Supergiant problem" in the literature, a phrase that was coined by Stephen Smartt in 2009 in reference to why red supergiants with masses ∼16-30M⊙ have ...
Dean's user avatar
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34 votes
1 answer
2k views

Why is there a gap in this image of supernova discoveries?

I came across this gif showing supernova discoveries from the late 19th century to 2010. Here's the data in 2010: Notice that there's a prominent region shaped like an inverted U in which there are ...
HDE 226868's user avatar
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7 votes
4 answers
5k views

Why don't we see more supernovae in our galaxy?

I found this on the Wikipedia page on supernovae: The total supernova rate in our galaxy is estimated to be about 4.6 per century, or one every 22 years, although we haven't actually observed one ...
mgr326639's user avatar
  • 173
2 votes
2 answers
413 views

"Supernova" is the explosion or the resulting celestial body? Is it incorrect to call the explosion "supernova"?

Sorry for such a newbie question. I searched and read multiples sources about supernova but I'm not completely sure if what is called "supernova" is the explosion, the resulting celestial body or the ...
Curious's user avatar
  • 21
4 votes
1 answer
2k views

Why can't neutron stars ignite and explode?

Beyond the Chandrasekhar limit, white dwarfs become extremely hot. As a result, previously unfusable carbon can become fusable, causing nuclear reactions. This leads to a thermal runaway and ...
Sir Cumference's user avatar
8 votes
2 answers
2k views

Why does the Chandrasekhar limit affect white dwarfs differently?

The Chandrasekhar limit is the maximum mass of a stable white dwarf star. Beyond this, a carbon-oxygen white dwarf will typically explode in a type 1a supernova, due to the nuclear reactions at those ...
Sir Cumference's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
1k views

Stellar mass limits for Neutron Star and Black Holes

Don't hate on me if I am asking a very basic and straightforward thing. I have a few questions about black holes and neutron stars. What is the mass range (in terms of solar masses) for a main ...
Youstay Igo's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
220 views

What is the last nuclear reaction in a binary system before supernova?

I understand that binary star systems may cause type Ia supernovae. I have a question regarding supernova explosion in a binary system. What is the last nuclear reaction before massive explosion? I ...
Mary.Lou's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
540 views

How to form Copper from Calcium in a supernova explosion?

What are the reasonable chain of reactions to form copper (63, 29) from ca(40, 20) during supernova explosion? And how it will happen? I do not understand the theory behind it. I thought that the ...
Berkley J's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
114 views

What could be a star-like object that shines at daytime for few seconds? What's the probability to see it?

Some years ago I looked up to the blue sky, around 2 PM, and I saw, for 2 or 3 seconds, something like a star fading out. Could it be a Supernova or another phenomena? Is it highly possible?
Leandros López's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
79 views

My supernovae question [duplicate]

I understand the collapse of a star during a supernova, as the outward pressure cannot compete with the gravitational field. Is it conceivable, that a relaxation of the space-time curvature is what ...
Steve Feldman's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
186 views

Gravitational field released during supernovae

During the collapse of a star at the commencement of supernovae, the intense pressures force fusion and fission to create the heavier elements and release vast amounts of energy. As this energy/mass ...
Steve Feldman's user avatar
2 votes
5 answers
5k views

Fusion of elements inside heavy stars

I am confused with nucleosynthesis inside supernovae. I have read that the heavier elements are made through fusion of lighter element's namely hydrogen and helium. Does the star "store" all the ...
Lucian09474's user avatar
15 votes
1 answer
371 views

How quickly does a supernova heat up/expand?

Suppose there's a star out there that's a lot more massive than the Sun. Suppose further that orbiting this star is a planet not unlike Earth. Water, oxygen, civilization, and all. Now the star ...
Ricky's user avatar
  • 1,345
12 votes
1 answer
247 views

How is the first detonation in Supernove type Ia triggered?

Ok, I read about the Supernova of type Ia and I found out that there are two detonations happening. First one is in helium shell around the white dwarf and second one seems to be triggered by the ...
Vojta Klimes's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
770 views

Is a supernova's core temperature absolute zero just before collapse?

I thought a supernova's core temperature was absolute zero just before it collapsed, as it has run out of all nuclear and thermal energy, but I haven't been able to confirm this online anywhere and I ...
user9549's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
2k views

How massive does a main sequence star need to be to go type 1 supernova?

We know the mass a white dwarf needs to be. That's well defined by the Chandrasekhar limit, but before a main sequence star turns into a white dwarf it tends to lose a fair bit of its matter in a ...
userLTK's user avatar
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2 votes
3 answers
6k views

When the sun explodes, will some of the planets in the Solar System survive and become rogue planets?

Say if a large enough star, that has a number of planets, were to explode in a supernova: Would any of the planets survive? Would they become rogue planets?
CipherBot's user avatar
  • 1,301
19 votes
2 answers
4k views

Does any iron fuse in stars before they go supernova?

I understand that iron and all heavier elements consume more energy to produce than they make, and that is what eventually leads to a supernova. I also understand that a lot of the heavier elements ...
caffein's user avatar
  • 293
12 votes
2 answers
8k views

Is it possible to witness a star's death?

Given that the stars' distances to Earth are measured in light-years (for example, Sirius is 8.6 light-years away from Earth), what we are seeing as Sirius now is actually its state 8.6 years ago, ...
jeff's user avatar
  • 233
2 votes
2 answers
661 views

What is faster than a supernova explosion?

Is a supernova explosion really fast or is it just fast, metaphorically speaking? Can you cite the fastest known phenomenon in astronomy (neutron stars, pulsars) besides supernovae in terms of ...
interstellar773382's user avatar
6 votes
2 answers
212 views

Does the shape of a supernova remnant depend on the progenitor star's magnetic field?

The magnetic field activity in a star can be very chaotic and my question is are they somehow related?
user6760's user avatar
  • 2,501
0 votes
1 answer
195 views

If you're near a black hole and your time is slowed down, would a supernova be observable to both you and someone outside of the blackhole's pull?

Let's say that Person A is on a planet orbiting a black hole (like the one from Interstellar) and time is slowed for Person A. Person B is back home on Earth. Now let's say a supernova happens and it'...
OverRatedProgrammer's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
627 views

Speed of blast from supernova

How fast does the blast front of a supernova expand at? Is it close to the speed of light or is it less than a quarter of the speed of light?
LDC3's user avatar
  • 2,036
2 votes
1 answer
5k views

Can a supernova make a new star? [duplicate]

Today I was wondering with a friend about the birth of a star. So we know that stars are born from a nebula, but the residue of a dead star (like a supernova) is itself a nebula. So can a star be born ...
Leo91's user avatar
  • 123
4 votes
1 answer
208 views

Accelerating universe expansion and standard candle

Recent stars (and standard candle supernova), afaik, contain more heavy elements than older stars. As consequence, I guess, recent stars and supernova should be slightly dimmer than older stars? If ...
ddur's user avatar
  • 43
6 votes
1 answer
165 views

What more could be learned from a rare astronomical event if we knew precisely when it would occur?

This is actually related to a question I recently asked on Worldbuilding, but seemed more appropriately asked here. To keep this from being too broad in scope, let's assume that someone figured out ...
IchabodE's user avatar
  • 526
4 votes
1 answer
762 views

How can a supernova affect black hole in a binary system?

Suppose in a binary stars system there is a dying star and a companion black hole as they orbit around each other. My question is what will possibly happen to the black hole if the partner goes ...
user6760's user avatar
  • 2,501
8 votes
1 answer
296 views

How often are new astronomical objects (variable stars, supernovae, comets, etc) discovered by amateurs?

How often are new astronomical objects (variable stars, supernovae, comets, etc) discovered by amateurs? Where could one report new findings?
abb's user avatar
  • 111
3 votes
1 answer
3k views

Why do astronomers use supernova to measure distance in space?

Why can't the distances between our Sun and the celestial objects be measured directly and instead had to rely on looking around for supernova? Is these events frequent, evenly distributed and lasting ...
user6760's user avatar
  • 2,501