Questions tagged [terrestrial-planets]

A terrestrial planet is a planet that has a compact rocky surface like the Earth's; the four innermost planets in the solar system.

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If a planet gained too many moons could the tidal forces of those moons rip the planet apart?

Or would the planet just be subject to extremely intense tidal forces instead?
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Are there other planetary systems where gas giants are on the inside to rocky planet orbits?

I understand that formation theories for gas giants suggest they should be born further away where there is more gas for them to monopolize vs the sun, and then to form Hot Jupiters they need to ...
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Why does half of a planet's radius end up being the radius of the core?

This answer makes the assumption that the ratio between the radius of a planet and the radius of its core is roughly constant shortly after planetary formation. Why should this be the case? Do we know ...
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What is the gaseous-to-rocky ratio of exoplanets?

Around the Sun, there are as many gaseous planets (Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune) as there are rocky planets (Mercury, Venus, Earth and Mars). Do other stars have similar gaseous-to-rocky ...
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Is there a clear-cut difference between rocky and gaseous planets?

A gas giant planet is large enough that it retains a lot of hydrogen and helium. A rocky planet is one with a solid surface. That's the rule of thumb to distinguish between the rocky and gaseous ...
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Magneto tail effect on the other planet in a binary planet system

Let's say there are 2 earth sized planets orbiting each other around 750,000km apart and at a distance of roughly 1.2 AU from a sunlike star with a mass of 1.105 solar masses. Since they are binary, ...
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Are there any planets or moons denser than Earth?

Earth has the highest density out of all planets, planetoids and moons of our planetary system, and also has a higher density than the Sun. Do we know any exoplanets or moons denser than Earth?
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Why is the Earth's magnetic field stronger than its neighbors?

[Edited] I've learned that the Earth's core is hot due to decay of radioactive elements, causing the liquid part of the core to stay liquid. This was stated as an explanation to why the Earth has a ...
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How would water-ammonia oceans behave?

Scientists strongly suspect that several moons in our solar system have frozen-over oceans of water-ammonia mixture. I've also read speculations on the possibility of surface water-ammonia oceans on ...
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Surface conditions of lonely (rogue) planets

The question How are rogue planets discovered? describes the difficulties in finding planets (or planet-sized objects) that are floating through space without being under the influence of any star or ...
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Do celestial bodies actually appear larger along the horizon? [duplicate]

Whether it be the moon (especially when full) or tonight, as Mars is closer than it has been in decades, it appears that these bodies are larger when close to the horizon than overhead. Is this an ...
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Terrestrial Exoplanet Skies – I've Built a Visual Sky Chart. Is it Accurate?

I'm an artist (and science enthusiast) and I've been trying to find a comprehensive resource that would help me clearly identify likely sky colors (as perceived by human vision) for exoplanets that ...
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Which planets, nebula, and other objects can be seen using Celestron Astromaster 130EQ

I have got a Celestron Astromaster 130EQ telescope, which lens should I use to see the various planets and nebula? When I tried to see Mars it was only a small red dot on scope. As per the ...
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How can we tell the age of a rogue planet?

Is it possible to find out how old is a planet, especially a rogue planet? I know that people measured the radioactive decays to determine Earth's age with some amazing accuracy, but what about ...
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Why don't we have in-between planets?

The planets in our system are most often grouped into two categories: Terrestrial: Mercury Venus Earth Mars Gas Giants: Jupiter Saturn Uranus Neptune Why is it that we don't see "in-between" ...
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Does terrestrial planets conduct heat from near to far side?

Suppose a terrestrial planet with no atmosphere is tidally locked and very near the star like a hot Jupiter. Is the far side still very cold or would crust would conduct heat from the near side to ...
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Is the material that could have formed a “Super-earth” divided among the four terrestrial planets

I know "super-earths" are quite common in other planetary systems, but there are none in the Solar System. Is it due to the material that could have created a single large super-earth being used to ...
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In rocky planets,does fast rotation cause flatting or low flatting imply slow rotation?

As far as I know, Venus and Mercury have 0 flatting, but Mars and Earth have detectable flatting, and Venus and Mercury are both rotating slowly. I'm confused as to the relation between rotational ...
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Is extraterrestrial mining more difficult or impractical for bodies without plate tectonics?

This article talks about the possibility of mining Uranium on the moon. Since the Moon lacks the geological forces that have created veins of concentrated minerals on Earth, would extraterrestrial ...
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Do the terrestrial planets form later than gas giants in our solar system?

Sorry I forgot where this statements come from, but I also remember the reason behind it is due to young Jupiter moves inwards and destroys the original super earth in inner solar system, and the ...
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Is Ceres a terrestrial-type (dwarf) planet?

Does Ceres belong to the terrestrial-type celestial bodies?
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Types of Exoplanets

We discover vastly more exoplanets that are gas giants that orbit their parent star very closely, than small terrestrial planets that are more distant to their sun. Could this be due to the methods we ...
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Statistics of elements abundance in exoplanets

Recently, I encountered the concept of carbon planets - planets, which would be, unlike the Earth, formed mostly by carbon, instead of oxygen, silicon and magnesium. (I am not counting iron, which is ...
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Which planet or moon has all resources that can be used to sustain life in a controlled biosphere? [closed]

Now that we are making it to Mars, continuing onward, in an effort for humanity to civilize other planets, not just setting up residential colonies, but to mine minerals and carry on geological and ...
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What Causes the Large Radiation Fields Around Jupiter?

I had heard that the large radiation belts around Jupiter may be formed by liquid metallic hydrogen in (or around) Jupiter's core (which Wikipedia says haven't been observed in labs yet due to the ...
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Have Pluto or any of its moons been mapped?

I was looking over some of the data for the terrestrial planets, and noticed that Venus, despite its cloud covering, had been mapped by the Arecibo Observatory. Also that other planets such as mars, ...
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Why Did Mars lose its Magnetic Field?

I had heard that Mars once had a planetary magnetic field, but that it is now gone? What happened to it?
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What implications do younger Earth and Moon have on Late Heavy Bombardment genesis hypotheses?

The Late Heavy Bombardment (LHB) or the Lunar Cataclysm is when the inner solar system, including the Earth and the Moon, underwent multiple and sustained heavy impacts early in their history (around ...