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Questions tagged [tidal-forces]

Questions about the apparent force stretching a body towards and away from the center of mass of another body due to the variance in acceleration due to gravity

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Would a satellite that has a retrograde orbit and a shorter orbtial period than its planet's rotational period be tidally accelerated or decelerated?

There are 4 configurations to consider. A satellite orbiting a planet that: Has a prograde orbit and larger orbital period than its planet's rotational period (example: The Moon) Has a prograde ...
user267545's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
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Does a rotating moon experience greater tidal heating than a tidally locked equivalent?

Tidal heating of a tidally locked moon is relatively straight forward to calculate, even though details of its internal structure is hard to work out in the first place. By contrast, tidal heating due ...
SE - stop firing the good guys's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
494 views

How does using Tidal energy affect the moon?

Reading another question Where do we have it from that the Moon is migrating away from Earth? I makes me ask what effect does harvesting tidal energy for electricity production have on the rate the ...
orathaic's user avatar
6 votes
2 answers
169 views

What's the equation for moon-moon tidal heating?

Between a moon and the primary, the equation for tidal heating is: $$\dot E_\mathit{Tidal} = - Im(k_2) \frac{21}{2} \frac{GM_h^2 R^5 n e^2}{a^6}$$ But how does one calculate the tidal heating between ...
SE - stop firing the good guys's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
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Can tidal locking increase rotational kinetic energy? Where does the energy come from then? [closed]

I was thinking about the explanation for how the Moon gets tidally locked with the Earth. We are working in the non-rotating reference frame of the Earth, and assume it is inertial (to an approximate ...
Maximal Ideal's user avatar
27 votes
3 answers
5k views

Why don't the inner moons of Jupiter have tidally-induced volcanism?

Volcanism on Io is caused by the fact that it is tidally heated. There are four moons that are closer to Jupiter than Io with higher eccentricities, yet they don't seem to have any volcanism at their ...
usernumber's user avatar
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2 votes
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Why do tides reach a peak two days after the solar eclipse?

On June 21st we, in India, experienced a total solar eclipse. Based on my basic understanding of why tides occur, the tidal forces by moon and sun add up and the tides will be maximum on the day of ...
claws's user avatar
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16 votes
7 answers
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Why there are no terrestrial planets with a subsurface ocean?

Subsurface oceans in satellites are pretty common: Europa, Enceladus, Ganymede, Callisto, maybe Pluto... This is due to tidal heating of their host planet, Jupiter and Saturn, which heats up the inner ...
Carlos Vázquez Monzón's user avatar
11 votes
2 answers
558 views

Does Saturn raise tides on Titan's lakes?

Titan is the only body in the Solar System other than Earth to have large bodies of surface liquid. Since Saturn is much more massive than the Moon, I would expect for tides, if they're present to ...
ChristieToWin's user avatar
8 votes
1 answer
1k views

How strong are the tides raised by Io on Jupiter relative to the ones raised by the Moon on Earth?

There seems to be 2 ways of calculating tidal forces that appear contradictory. Either: By calculating the difference of Io's gravitational acceleration on a point on Jupiter's near side and the ...
user267545's user avatar
9 votes
1 answer
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If Saturn's rings cannot coalesce into a moon because of tidal forces, then how are shepherd moons able to exist?

From Wikipedia: In celestial mechanics, the Roche limit, also called Roche radius, is the distance within which a celestial body, held together only by its own force of gravity, will disintegrate due ...
user177107's user avatar
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How will the Solar tides affect the Earth's rotation once it is tidally locked to the Moon?

It is my understanding that the tidal forces of the Moon acting on Earth cause it to slow down its rotation and, because angular momentum is conserved, the Moon's orbit subsequently expands. This ...
user177107's user avatar
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2 answers
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Can you create an orbit in a space station using balls?

Would it be possible to spin a ball in a space station, and for it to create its own orbit for a smaller ball to rotate around it?
user6579's user avatar
9 votes
1 answer
841 views

Why do planets in red dwarf star systems tend to have a higher probability to get tidally locked?

I have read about about the habitability of red dwarf systems on Wikipedia, as well as some web articles on similar topics. The problem is, it does not explain why and how it happened. Google search ...
Yudhi G.'s user avatar
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1 answer
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Is the process responsible for Triton's nearly perfect circular orbit going to happen in my fictional world?

First of all, I'd like to point out that I'm a worldbuilder and I like my worlds to be as physically possible as... possible. I am in the process of building a world with a habitable moon orbiting ...
Mymokol's user avatar
  • 41
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1 answer
142 views

Vectorial construction of tidal forces - or why is it centripetal at low tide

I am seeking to understand why the tidal force is pushing towards the center of the earth (centripetal), at a point that is making with the center of the earth a 90º angle to the moon-earth axis. ...
Jean-Denis Muys's user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
270 views

Scientific possibility of stationary moons for a writer of fiction

I tried to do some research to find an answer for this question before posting this but didn't find anything that I could sink my teeth into. I was wondering: if it would be possible for a planet to ...
user42510's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
272 views

Hills' mechanism for making Hypervelocity Stars

In Hill’s mechanism, the gravitational tidal force of a single MBH disrupts an approaching binary. One star is captured on an eccentric orbit around the MBH and, by conservation of energy, the ...
Keith McClary's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
177 views

Where does Love's number come from in $\delta m = \frac{1}{2}k_2M_2\lbrace\frac{R_1}{r_\star}\rbrace^3$, the formula for the mass of a tidal bulge?

My question refers to page 165 of this paper. Specifically, how does one derive the equation $\delta m = \frac{1}{2}k_2M_2\lbrace\frac{R_1}{r_\star}\rbrace^3$ for the mass of a tidal bulge? A full ...
wrb98's user avatar
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Derivation of a formula for the mass of a tidal bulge and tidal torque

I've been looking into the tidal mechanism for a binary star system and seem to have hit a brick wall. In the literature (see below), little explanation is given to justify the equations (9.60), (9.61)...
user29126's user avatar
14 votes
2 answers
6k views

How does the Moon's gravity affect Earth's oceans despite Earth's stronger gravitational pull?

Given that Earth has a much stronger gravitational pull than the Moon, how does the Moon have any influence on Earth's oceans?
Steve's user avatar
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1 answer
267 views

Why the torque exerted by the moon upon the Earth makes the Moon to increase his orbit? [duplicate]

For what I know, this torque exists because of the misalignment of the tidal bulge with the apsidal line Earth-Moon a certain angle $\alpha$, which makes the earth rotation to slow down a bit. But, ...
Carlos Vázquez Monzón's user avatar
6 votes
2 answers
265 views

Why would tidal forces on planets become more intense when a star becomes a white dwarf?

I was puzzled by this press release by the Royal Astronomical Society: "Small, hardy planets most likely to survive death of their stars" - phys.org, May 14, 2019 Astrophysicists from the Warwick ...
Jacob C.'s user avatar
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5 votes
3 answers
524 views

Question about tidal forces and the Roche limit

As we know, an object that is beyond the Roche limit doesn't disintegrate (obviously) because the tidal forces upon the object are weaker than the gravitational pull of the object towards its centre, ...
Carlos Vázquez Monzón's user avatar
4 votes
0 answers
140 views

Do tides occur on planets like Neptune, having water? [duplicate]

I mean, we experience tides here on earth because of combined effect of gravitational field of moon and sun. So I thought that tides could also occur on other planets. Let us consider Neptune where ...
Gamira's user avatar
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4 answers
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Do tides occur on planets like Neptune, having water?

I mean, we experience tides here on earth because of combined effect of gravitational field of moon and sun. So I thought that tides could also occur on other planets. Let us consider Neptune where ...
Gamira's user avatar
  • 209
2 votes
2 answers
182 views

In planetary and astronomical science, what exactly is, or is not, a tidal force?

I'm wondering exactly in which situations forces between bodies are, and are not consider to be tidal forces in the context of planetary and astronomical science. If two rigid, non-deformable ...
uhoh's user avatar
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10 votes
1 answer
243 views

Does the orbital decay of Triton affect Neptune's rotation?

Just a quick question regarding Neptune. Because Phobos is spiraling in towards Mars, Mars' rotation speeds up. Does the same thing happen with Neptune's rotation?
StellarExile's user avatar
7 votes
1 answer
76 views

Does Earth changes angular velocity in 24 hours evaluation?

I am trying to detect tidal forces influence on a pendulum. I use a laser interferometer that is able to detect very tiny space changes. The pendulum never stops even after long times quiet and ...
Anderson Alves's user avatar
5 votes
0 answers
54 views

Why Tidal Tails in Disk Galaxies, but not in Ellipticals?

Why do tidal tails result from only disk galaxies but not ellipticals. I understand that tidal tails are results of gravitational interactions not strong enough to completely plunge out the material ...
samhitha's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
316 views

Solid-body tides on the Moon

There are various good models for solid-body tides on the Earth. Are there any recommendations for tides on the Moon?
scb's user avatar
  • 61
6 votes
2 answers
6k views

Trisolar syzygy and it's effects on the planet

Slightly spoilers here, but in the novel The Three-Body Problem, there's a scene in which Civilization #184 is destroyed by the stacked gravitational attraction of the planet's (aptly named Trisolaris)...
Yuri-M-Dias's user avatar
7 votes
3 answers
3k views

Jacobi vs tidal radius for star cluster

The tidal radius is defined in King (1962) as: the value of r (the radius) at which f (the density profile) reaches zero... This also referred by King as the "limiting radius" written as (Eq 3): $...
Gabriel's user avatar
  • 822
6 votes
4 answers
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Does the Earth orbiting around the Earth-Moon barycenter cause a measurable centrifugal force?

I just realized the Earth is not a stationary object with the moon orbiting around it. As shown in this minimalist animation from Wikipedia, the Earth actually orbits a common barycenter with the ...
JPhi1618's user avatar
  • 163
5 votes
2 answers
3k views

Why are tides high only on a full moon day?

As far as I've known, sea tides are higher on a Full moon day. And that is due to the "gravitational pull" of the moon. But we know that moon is visible because of reflection of sun's rays. So, even ...
Space crawler's user avatar
8 votes
2 answers
807 views

Eventual outcome of tidal acceleration and deceleration

So, I know the Moon experiences tidal acceleration from the Earth. And, from what I've read, if not for the fact that the sun would boil away the oceans and engulf both of them first, about 50 billion ...
user1410910's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
543 views

Moon, center of mass & geometric center, tidal locking

Since the moon is tidally locked to earth, what about center of mass and geometric center? How far from each other are they? Can a celestial body be tidally locked to an other one if its mass ...
user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
720 views

Is Jupiter's rotation slowing?

According to Wikipedia, re Europa's tidal flexing: the tidal flexing kneads Europa's interior and gives it a source of heat, possibly allowing its ocean to stay liquid while driving subsurface ...
dashnick's user avatar
  • 143
3 votes
2 answers
802 views

How do stars affect the orbits of moons?

I asked a question previous similar to this, but I'm wondering, can a star make a moon move closer to its planet or further away? How?
StellarExile's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
51 views

What would the tides on the Trappist-1 planets be like? [duplicate]

In the recent press conference about the planets orbiting around Trappist-1, one of the astronomers mentioned that the planets are close enough to each other that the tidal forces between planets are ...
AstronomyGeek's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
754 views

Requirements for a satellite/planet to be tidally locked to a planet/star

The Moon is tidally locked to the Earth, the Four Galilean are tidally locked as well, and the recently found planetary sistem TRAPPIST-1 has seven tidally locked planets, but Venus or Mercury are not....
Carlos Vázquez Monzón's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
373 views

What is the level of tidal heating between bodies that are already in mutual tidal lock?

As I understood tidal heating, it comes from tidal force acting upon a body as it spins, distorting it; the wave of distortion travels along the surface (along with apparent travel of the other body ...
SF.'s user avatar
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8 votes
2 answers
657 views

Are the Trappist-1 planets close enough to be tidally heated?

According to the NASA press release, the Trappist planets are close enough (only a few million kilometers) that "the tidal forces between the planets are not negligible". The speaker says that this ...
Phiteros's user avatar
  • 3,166
5 votes
1 answer
475 views

Why is the eccentricity of Triton so low?

Triton is very special, since its orbit is retrograde respect Neptune, its obliquity is near 0° and its orbit is almost circular (according to Harris (1984) is $5 \times 10^{-4}$). I'm familiar with ...
Carlos Vázquez Monzón's user avatar
14 votes
5 answers
2k views

Is there any way for a planet orbiting a red dwarf in the habitable zone to not be tidally locked?

Is there any way to avoid the tidal locking of a planet orbiting a red dwarf in the habitable zone? For example, could a planet with a 90° obliquity and large moon avoid such a situation?
Soba's user avatar
  • 243
-1 votes
3 answers
354 views

Why and how the Moon experiences only slight tidal forces [closed]

I understood the literal meaning of the red-underlined sentences, but frankly speaking, I don't know the processes. I mean I want to know how Earth's rotation makes a cycle of two high and two low ...
Purple Rain Kim's user avatar
16 votes
2 answers
4k views

Will the Earth ever be tidally locked to the Moon?

From my basic understating, Momentum is being transfered from the Earth's rotation to the Moon's orbit by tidal friction. The Earth's rotation slows down and the Moon receedes from the Earth as it ...
TheWhaleOnPluto's user avatar
7 votes
1 answer
881 views

Effects of the solar tide on planets

It’s well known that (lunar) tides on Earth result in a transfer of angular momentum from Earth proper to the Earth–Moon orbital motion. That’s why the Moon resides now in a high Earth orbit, and ...
Incnis Mrsi's user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
2k views

Tidal influences of planets on the sun

How big are the tidal influences of planets (say, Jupiter) on the sun? Do they lead to any measurable effects, for example, do they influence the sunspots, or are they observable in any other way?
dirkt's user avatar
  • 153
4 votes
2 answers
3k views

What is the real position of the tidal bulge?

The wikipage on "tidal accelaeration" has this picture of the tidal bulge: but says that: The average tidal bulge is synchronized with the Moon's orbit, and Earth rotates under this tidal ...
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