All Questions

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
0
votes
1answer
7 views

How to see Mars and Venus in color?

My telescope is Arsenal - Synta 70/700 AZ2 (refractor model). 140x max zoom (10 mm with Barlow). I could clearly see Jupiter and Saturn in color. I even saw brown stripes on Jupiter. Yet, when I tried ...
1
vote
2answers
28 views

can moon rise before sun and set after it in the same day

I found it mentioned in ancient Arabic astronomic book Kitāb al-Amwāl by Ibn Qutaybah (889 AD) Cresent can't be seen in the morning in the east in front of the sun and in the evening i the west ...
0
votes
0answers
8 views

What is the mass and momentum of a relativistic jet?

Relativistic jets from accreting black holes are powerful radiation sources, but carries some ionized matter along. What are the estimates or observations of the mass or momentum flow in such jets?
1
vote
1answer
43 views

What satellite is this?

While out viewing the Perseid shower last night (8/11/20), we saw an interesting object that I'm trying to identify. We're in the vicinity of Portland, Oregon. It appeared to be traveling west->...
1
vote
0answers
19 views

Determine spectral type of star from its properties

How can I determine spectral type of star, if I know all its another properties? For Example, Rigel A has spectral type B8Ia. Rigel has temperature 12 500 K. ...
1
vote
1answer
25 views

How can one determine the angle between the line of nodes and the major axis of the orbit of Mars?

I know when northern summer is on Mars, the solar radiation on its surface has a minimum of 492 W/m², meaning that is also the time when Mars is furthest from the Sun. So this would coincidence ...
0
votes
1answer
26 views

Question about semi-major axis mean separation

I am currently doing an assignment but I cannot for the life of me understand what one of terms used means. Notice I am not trying to get help with the assignment itself, but rather to make me ...
6
votes
2answers
1k views

What color is a red dwarf star?

I read recently that a red dwarf star might actually look white. I realize there's a wide range in red dwarf surface temperature, 2,500 to 3,500 degrees K, compared to 5,778 for our Sun. Metal at ...
1
vote
2answers
23 views

How can I estimate the initial luminosity of a SNIa given initial mass of Ni-56?

The initial portion (and peak) of a SNIa's light curve is powered by the $\beta$-decay reaction: $$ ^{56}Ni \rightarrow ^{56}Co + e^+ + \nu_e + \gamma $$ Supposing we know how much Ni-56 is created in ...
1
vote
0answers
35 views

Celestron C14 collimation and cleaning

When checking the collimation of a Celestron 14" SCT I took this image: My question is: how much will the particles causing the local aberrations affect the image quality? (i.e. do I need to ...
2
votes
0answers
57 views

How did we measure the mass of the universe?

In an wiki article, observable universe, it was mentioned that, Mass (ordinary matter) 1.5×10^53 kg I wonder how did we measure the mass of our observable universe?
3
votes
1answer
82 views

Can a telescope ever increase the apparent luminance of an extended object?

From what I know about common telescope designs, telescopes don't increase the apparent luminance of extended objects compared to the luminance seen with the naked eye. In this sense extended objects ...
3
votes
0answers
49 views

How much (more or less) of the moon will be visible as it recedes from the Earth?

The Moon is receding from the Earth, at a rate of about 4 cm per year. We can currently see about 59% of the Moon's surface, from the Earth's surface. Will the amount of the Moon's surface we can see ...
1
vote
0answers
13 views

Why is the peak value(s) of the spectral radiance of the CMB different if you calculate with freq. instead of wavelength?

On Wikipedia, the calculated value of the peak frequency of the cosmic microwave background is 160.23 GHz, but it says if you do the calculating with wavelengths, then convert to frequency, you get a ...
0
votes
0answers
11 views

What was the energy/wavelength/frequency of the CMB when first emitted/released?

Given the z redshift of 1089, and the temperature difference between then and now of about 1089, I tried scaling the ev, freq. and wavelength by 1089.... Is that right? I get a freq. of about 240 ...
9
votes
4answers
3k views

How much does the sky change in a few thousand years?

The "fixed stars" are not actually fixed, the earth's tilt changes over time etc., but all that happens slowly on human timescales. Imagine a Babylonian astronomer (or astrologist?) ...
0
votes
1answer
48 views

360 degree image of the whole sky

I look for an image that I know exists. It is an image showing the whole sky, showing all stars and galaxies bright enough to be visible at the resolution, projected to the same shape that is commonly ...
2
votes
2answers
122 views

If the solar system is nearly flat, then why don't all the planets appear to lie on the same axis when viewed from earth?

For instance, consider the image below. The location of the planets seem to be so random relative to Earth. If the solar system was indeed flat, then I would expect the planets to lie on the same '...
1
vote
1answer
41 views

Picking two random points in space and drawing a line between them, what is the chance the line intersects anything?

I thought of this question after pondering how most of the observable universe is observable. If we can observe it, then the space between us and that object must have been unoccupied to allow the ...
3
votes
1answer
29 views

How can I calculate the uncertainties in magnitude like the CDS does?

When you check an entry of the Gaia DR2 stellar catalogue in Vizier, for example this one, you can see that there is a value for the G magnitude (in our case 18.0733 mag) and a value for the ...
32
votes
4answers
4k views

Why can't we see Saturn's phases from earth?

In the Astronomy Picture of the Day from August 8, 2020 ("Crescent Saturn"), the caption states From Earth, Saturn never shows a crescent phase Why is this? We can observe phases on ...
1
vote
1answer
46 views

Timekeeping on other celestial bodies than Earth

I have looked for months for any site capable of calculating solar altitude w.r.t an observer located on the surface of a generic celestial bodies, but with no luck as of now. Even NASA does not ...
3
votes
1answer
47 views

Black Hole - energy and matter

Can someone explain what is happening with energy (e.g. light) and matter which was collected by a black hole? I suppose that matter builds a black hole's mass and size, but what about light? Does it ...
-1
votes
0answers
26 views

Problem 7- chapter 13 of the Astronomy Principle and practice.-Calculate the radius of Venus

Well, this is one of the exercises from chapter 13 of the Astronomy Principle and Practice, which using Kepler's Laws to solve it. But if there are other ways to solve that would be great. Thank you!
1
vote
1answer
62 views

How does a cross dispersed spectrum look like in a reality (from echelle spectrographs)?

I am an analytical chemist with some interest in amateur spectroscopy. Since astronomers use echelle spectrographs to study the high resolution spectrum of the stars, someone suggested to post the ...
11
votes
2answers
1k views

Shouldn't tidal locking be impossible for a satellite that has a considerably eccentric orbit?

This popped up into my mind just now. The Moon is tidally locked to Earth, and also has a significantly eccentric orbit. This means that its orbital velocity near periapsis is considerably faster than ...
4
votes
2answers
480 views

What is meant by “vastness of space, which now filled a volume of a hundred million light years”?

I am reading the book Cosmic biology: How life could evolve on other worlds (citation below) and do not understand the meaning of the following paragraph from page 4 (emphasis mine): It took 200,000 ...
8
votes
2answers
2k views

Where is the Perseids meteor shower coming from?

Swift–Tuttle Comet has orbital period of 133.28 years. Yet, people say that debris and dust from this comet causes this meteor shower. This does not make any sense. Or do they want to say that from ...
5
votes
1answer
50 views

Strange trail left by shooting star [duplicate]

I saw something really odd last night that I cannot understand. Last night I got up around 3am to catch a glimpse of the upcoming Perseids meteor shower, now I know it's not peaking until next week ...
3
votes
2answers
189 views

Are all solutions of the 3-body problem restricted to 2 dimensions?

I am not a physicist. Suppose there are two massive bodies orbiting each other. Their orbit will presumably define a plane. As far as I know, the existing solutions to the 3-body problem are limited ...
3
votes
1answer
34 views

What is wrong with my calculations of Jupiter's apparent magnitude?

I was searching for a formula to calculate the apparent magnitude of a planet knowing its physical characteristics and stumbled upon this answer. The final formula given is: $$m_{planet} = V_{planet} +...
1
vote
3answers
57 views

Practicality of Dobsonian telescopes

I've been using binocular for more than a decade for visual observation. I'm thinking of upgrading to a telescope. The Dob caught my attention due to its simplicity in setup and also cost ...
1
vote
1answer
17 views

Approximate formula to find velocity from cosmological redshift

From IOAA 2013 (Greece) Theory question no. 15, they stated that the approximate formula to find velocity from cosmological redshift is $$v = c*log_e (1+z)$$ and that it is often used by cosmologists. ...
8
votes
1answer
419 views

Why can there be several seconds of lag between a binary neutron star merger and the emission of gamma rays from the same area?

Answers to: Gravitational waves and gamma ray burst: how were the error bars determined for this speed of gravity calculation? Was $H_0$ used? go into substantial detail explaining this determination. ...
0
votes
1answer
81 views

how long a light year on earth will seem [closed]

First of all, sorry if this is not the right StackExchange to ask this question, but i don't know a better place (open to suggestion in case). So, the question: Suppose that for some reason, we can ...
3
votes
3answers
87 views

Impact on the rest of the solar system if Mercury or Venus were disassembled?

I've watched a few theoretical videos about Dyson spheres where they mention that the most practical way to do that would be to disassemble a planet - preferably one already close to the sun - Mercury ...
2
votes
1answer
50 views

Can an event horizon form with the observer already inside?

I am on a planet orbting a star around the center of the milky way (assume no supermassive blackhole there). By some mechanism, mass starting from the outer part of the galaxy gets pushed inward until ...
1
vote
2answers
89 views

Events I cannot explain

In the last few days I experienced two events I cannot explain. I watch the sky since I was a child so I'm aware of most events like satellites, ISS, Iridium flares, etc... First event It was about 22:...
1
vote
1answer
37 views

How did the orbits of Phobos and Deimos circularize?

The satellites of Mars might be captured asteroids. But Phobos has an eccentricity of $0.015$, and Deimos of $3\times10^{-4}$. If they were captured, they likely were captured with rather eccentric ...
8
votes
2answers
461 views

Gravitational waves and gamma ray burst: how were the error bars determined for this speed of gravity calculation? Was $H_0$ used?

This newly updated answer to How precise are the observational measurements for the speed of gravity? and this answer to How is the most accurate value of 𝐺 measured? cites the November 2017 arXiv ...
3
votes
1answer
60 views

Trying to use Canon 60D DSLR with Skywatcher 130P. Can't focus image

I have a Skywatcher Heritage 130P FlexTube Dobsonian Telescope. It works well, I can see lovely stars, planets, moons of Jupiter etc. It came with two eye pieces (1.25 inch): 10 mm and 25 mm. I also ...
4
votes
0answers
42 views

Why is our heliosphere an asymmetric croissant shape?

The big, recent astronomy news about our heliosphere's asymmetric croissant shape has me confused.... Some articles mention the influence on our solar system's outermost boundary of very hot cations, ...
1
vote
1answer
46 views

Angular diameter result confirmation

Not being a math-minded person at all, however basic it might appear to be to all of you in this particular question, I would like to get the following calculation confirmed. I'm trying to calculate ...
1
vote
1answer
77 views

50mm f1.8 for Astrophotography

I am considering using a 50mm f1.8 maybe even try aN 85mm f1.8 on my Astro FI 102MM Telescope have you any thoughts or suggestions? I have never taken images via a telescope so this is a whole new ...
1
vote
1answer
97 views

Is it possible to have a trinary star system with a planet that orbits their barycenter?

I am trying to model a 3-star system with a planet. The three stars have the same mass. I have gotten the stars (Yellow, Pink, Blue) into a stable orbit. However, I am wondering if a "free-...
-1
votes
1answer
74 views

How can something infinitely big have expanded from an infinitely small?

Please help me reconcile what I see as contradicting theories: The universe began with the Big Bang and expanded from an infinitesimally small point. The universe is infinite. How can something ...
2
votes
1answer
138 views

Is cosmology an accurate field? [closed]

I'm new here this is my first question. I'm an engineering student and I really like mathematics, I've recently watched a movie about Stephen Hawking (The Theory of Everything) In which he makes ...
1
vote
0answers
43 views

At what distance could a supernova damage the Earth's ozone layer?

As from my latter question it seems Betelgeuse might be much closer than the usually presumed 640 light years. It might be as close as ~440 ly. Suppose it is, would this have any dangerous effects on ...
1
vote
0answers
107 views

Why does Stellarium tell such imprecise distance for Betelgeuse? [duplicate]

The newest version of Stellarium, as well as the former ones, tell that Betelgeuse would be 497.95 ly plus/minus 56 ly away. Celestia also lists Betelgeuse ~500 ly away, but Celestia is comparably old....
5
votes
2answers
1k views

Can we change Earth's orbit with modern technology? [closed]

It is well known that, according to Newton's 3rd law, spacecrafts entering or leaving Earth provoke tiny (insignificant) changes to Earth's orbit (see related question here). My question is about ...

15 30 50 per page
1
2 3 4 5
188