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Results tagged with Search options answers only user 11143

Questions regarding Earth's only natural satellite.

7
votes
The reason that moon image looks wrong is because it is wrong. It is not a real image of the moon $-$ at least the terminator is not real. The original article you cite has a link just below their im …
answered Oct 19 '16 by zephyr
64
votes
First off, such an orbit wouldn't be a geostationary orbit since geo- refers to the Earth. A more appropriate name would be lunarstationary or selenostationary. I'm not sure if there is an officially …
answered Mar 22 '17 by zephyr
7
votes
The thing you have to really understand is that not all supermoons are equal. The official definition of a supermoon, as you state, is that the full moon must coincide with the moon being at perigee. …
answered Nov 16 '16 by zephyr
2
votes
This is such a complex problem that I think your chances of getting an accurate answer are almost nil. First, the equations are likely to be highly complex if you want to be accurate down to the tent …
answered Aug 30 '17 by zephyr
4
votes
Your son is more or less correct. The moon's size doesn't change appreciably. At best you only see the size vary by about 13% (in angular diameter). The variation in the apparent size of the moon com …
answered Oct 7 '16 by zephyr
4
votes
It is important to understand how this process works. The method described in your article is known as Bistatic Radar. In effect, a transmitter sends out a signal (generally a radio telescope in the m …
answered Aug 31 '16 by zephyr
4
votes
I'd caution that absolute statements are not good things in science. When Sagan says a natural satellite cannot be hallow, it is an absolute statement, but there's no way to 100% prove it true. That …
answered Nov 29 '16 by zephyr
15
votes
The answer to this is certainly tidal forces, but that doesn't explain the exact mechanism for how tidal forces result in tidal locking, i.e., an orbiting body showing the same face to the central bod …
answered Jul 6 '17 by zephyr