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Questions regarding a layer of gasses surrounding a celestial object.

2
votes
hydrogen) with increasing altitude. Eventually, all one finds are hydrogen and helium. These are the gases that escape from the atmosphere. …
answered Apr 1 '16 by David Hammen
7
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the case of the Earth) that counts, not the outer reaches of the atmosphere. The surface is a clear-cut, non-arbitrary boundary. The atmosphere? They can extend a long way out. A non-arbitrary boundary … arbitrary boundary explicitly excludes the upper reaches of the atmosphere, which extends out for many thousands of kilometers. For the giant planets, some use a tenth of the Earth's atmosphere as defining …
answered Jul 20 '15 by David Hammen
5
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planet rotation keep the atmosphere well-mixed. We can see this in our own atmosphere. Carbon dioxide and argon are considerably more dense than are the nitrogen and oxygen that form the bulk of the … atmosphere. Yet we don't have a layer of carbon dioxide at the bottom of the atmosphere. The turbopause marks where an atmosphere shifts from being dominated by turbulent mixing to being dominated by …
answered Nov 29 '16 by David Hammen
5
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' atmosphere away. Despite the marked differences between the atmospheres of Venus, Earth, and Mars, the atmospheric loss rates (in terms of mass loss per unit time) from these three planets are estimated to … be about the same. This rate represents a pittance for Venus' very large atmosphere of Venus, a small amount for Earth's somewhat large atmosphere, but a huge proportional loss rate for Mars. Titan is …
answered Jan 30 by David Hammen