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It's hard to tell, however the very likely solution of your problem lies in a combination of two or three effects: The image is not focused. Did you focus on bright stars or the moon and not change the phone afterwards? This a common problem and (I personally) find it hard with a phone to get a sharp image through a telescope. On the telescop I have ...


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What did the star look like in Live view in the Camera app on the phone? If it looked dim, the phone might be compensating for brightness in post-processing, leaving the image too exposed. If it looked bright in Live view, then that's obviously the reason. If the reason is not post-processing, I've got suggestions. Try exposure times of 5s, 10s, 15s and ...


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Whether the moon or any other body is visible depends on the angular separation, the angle of the ecliptic, the atmospheric conditions (particularly cloud) and the observer's eyesight, or visual aids used. It is not possible to prove that someone couldn't see the moon at a particular time and at a particular date, so any calendar system based on observation ...


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Here is 13 hours 48 minutes. That's a mighty early sighying: https://www.universetoday.com/107700/ultra-thin-young-crescent-moon-sighted-from-u-s-southwest/ 11 hours 40 minutes was the world record as of 2014.


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The SWAN C/2020 F8 comet is passing near Earth, but its magnitude will be around 5. This means that you need to have a rather dark sky and good enough eyes to be able to see it. From the comet observer's database In addition to this, the comet will be very low on the horizon during the night. Here is its track from Wikipedia Early June (when it will be ...


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Some easy deep sky objects you should try, Very Easy M45 Omega Centauri M13 Orion Nebula M81/82 M57 (the only planetary nebula you have a chance of seeing from a moderately light polluted sky) M6 & M7 Moderate (requires darker skies) M5 M2 M8, M17, M18, M20.... (basically the Sagittarius Area and star cloud) M31 M41 $h$ Persei and $\chi$ Persei


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How light polluted are you? As a general rule, here are the objects that are easiest to see in light polluted skies, in order: The Moon Bright stars Planets Globular clusters Bright nebulas such as Orion Bright galaxies like M-51 or Andromeda I have successfully imaged most of the Messier catalog objects from a white zone with an 8" telescope. Forget ...


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The Near-Earth close approches website shows close approaches to the Earth by near-Earth objects (NEOs). The table showing all close encounters indicates the absolute magnitude. The data can be exported to a CSV file to estimate the apparent magnitude for each object, using the following equation. $$ m = H + 5 \log_{10} \bigg( \frac{d_{BS}d_{BO}}{d_0^2} \...


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Both of these look OK to me. The biggest plus in the Omegon looks like the extra 10mm. If you're on a budget, taking a cheaper refractor and later taking a decent budget tracker (e.g. SkyTracker Pro) is a good move. Gradually building up your set of gear is key. Good luck! ps. Don't think you're going to take "budget photos" because you're on budget gear. ...


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Hi I did manage to write the code. Here is what I did import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import mpl_toolkits.mplot3d.axes3d as p3 import matplotlib.animation as animation import pandas as pd df1=pd.read_pickle("properties.csv") x=np.array(df1['x'])*3.24078e-17 y=np.array(df1['y'])*3.24078e-17 z=np.array(df1['z'])*3.24078e-17 data=[] for i ...


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After that I want to make it a bit complicated. I have the stars size and mass as well. I was wondering if I can change the size of the circles in the plot according to the radius and use different Colors for different mass range? That part has been addressed in previous questions and answers here, I remember reading maybe a year ago (+/- 0.9 years). Here ...


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