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Professional or amateur astronomy? Valuable data may be lost if the professional astronomers can not find ways to share the skies with the satellite companies and the satellite customers. I see no reason why the professionals will not cope with the situation. They have the necessary resources. The sky is there for the use of everyone. Those satellite would ...


3

You are right! Apogee is higher than Perigee, except when the orbit is perfectly circular when they're equal. Semi-major axis will be half-way between the two. 572 km doesn't make sense. As pointed out in comments, expressed like this they are the distances from Earth's center minus a fixed equatorial radius of the earth, in this case about 6378.137 ...


2

Partial answer only. 120 degrees of sky in 5 seconds or so. 120 degrees in 5 seconds is about 0.42 radians per second. At a distance of 70 km (roughly the distance where an overhead meteor would start to glow visibly) that would be roughly 29 km/sec. That's a nice number for a meteor. But it's quite a challenging number for an originally earth-launched ...


2

Have a look at Is it possible to capture geostationary satellites with DSLR? See the excellent advice in this answer to Are any geosynchronous satellites visible with the naked eye? No, but they are easily seen with a small telescope on a sturdy mount. March and September are the best times. Use an app to help you. My favorite way is to keep M11, the Wild ...


4

Satellites already cause problems for telescopes, but not by obstructing their view. Actually the light reflected from satellites is a bigger problem, and for observations of radio waves, their communications are the really big problem. In terms of reflected light, you might remember the controversy around the "Humanity Star" being too bright. The ...


0

Geostationary satellites are often seen with telescopes and occasionally result in a "Something Moved! Did I see a UFO?" sort of message. If you have a tracking telescope aimed at a star in the same field if view of a geostationary satellite the satellite will appear to move against the background. It you turn off telescope tracking the satellite ...


16

Satellites, even in geostationary orbits, move with respect to the background stars and make "trails" on telescopic images that are tracked at the sidereal rate. Removal of these can be as straightforward as taking the median of a set of exposures. What I mean by this, is that in a sequence of exposures, the satellite trail will pollute different ...


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