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Short answer: Many stars and other objects beyond the Solar System have proper names, but the vast majority of listed objects have only designations in one or more catalogs, and the vast majory of all the billions or trillions of objects observable with modern instruments have not been listed in any catalog and have no designation. Long Answer: So how many ...


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The rules from the the IAU for official designations are posted neatly here. More casual names, like the Black Widow Nebula, are not standardized, as far as I know. For astronomical objects outside of our own Solar System: the designation of astronomical objects beyond the Solar System should consist of at least two parts — a leading acronym and a sequence ...


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Names are common enough for solar system bodies, but generally stars don't have names, they have identifiers from various catalogues. In the case of Pulsars. they are named by their location in the sky. Just like Earth has longitude and latitude, every point in the sky has a "right ascension" and "declination". Due to the slow movement ...


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Tl;Dr: It is a matter of consideration if you want to call Kuiper belt bodies/Oort cloud bodies "asteroids" or not. Long answer: The Oort cloud defines the cosmographic boundary of the Solar System and the extent of the Sun's Hill sphere and hence it is loosely bound to the Solar System, and thus is easily affected by the gravitational pull both of ...


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I don't have an exact answer, too many factors are involved. If we consider Newtonian orbits, you can have a stable orbit as long as the perihelion is outside the Sun. But by getting closer to the Sun, two other effects start playing a role: tidal interactions and general relativity. I'm not an expert in general relativity, but I know that Mercury is already ...


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