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1

If you're thinking of the NASA DART mission (Double Asteroid Redirection Test), it hasn't launched yet. It's supposed to depart Earth between November 2021 and February 2022, and encounter 65803 Didymos and impact its satellite Dimorphos in September or October 2022. DART is the first part of the AIDA collaboration (Asteroid Impact and Deflection Assessment)....


1

We could be waiting a very long time, if ever, for a particular asteroid to impact the Earth. Using probes to take sames from asteroids gives a sample from a particular asteroid within a quick time frame so it can be analyzed "sooner" rather than later, if ever. Additionally, not all asteroids are the same. They can have different compositions. ...


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But little bits of asteroids fall to Earth all the time as meteorites. Why can't we just study those? Scientists do study those. Clair Cameron Patterson, for example, determined the age of the Earth between the late 1940s to mid 1950s using meteorites. However, he had to spend years addressing contamination issues before he developed his estimate of the age ...


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In the Perifocal Coordinate system, the unit vectors $\hat{p}$ and $\hat{q}$ define the plane of the orbit. $\hat{p}$ indicates the direction from the orbital focus to the periapsis. It is in the same direction as the eccentricity vector $\vec{e}$ $\hat{q}$ points at where the object would be at True Anomaly of 90°. $\hat{w} = \hat{p} \times \hat{q}$ is a ...


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This can be answered in two ways. At the Earth's orbit we do not necessarily sample (meteoroid intercepting Earth and surviving atmospheric entry to fall as a meteorite) all the taxonomic types (spectral classifications as presented by Bus et al., 2002, DeMeo et al., 2009, DeMeo et al., 2015) of asteroids in the form of meteorites. For example, more than ...


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