15

I believe the answer is yes, when the asteroid after the initial pass through the earth's atmosphere no longer has escape velocity relative to the earth, but enters an elliptical orbit around the earth. The perigee of the orbit will be within the atmosphere, so on the next pass the newly-captured earth satellite will lose more energy, lowering the perigee ...


12

If by "more than once" you mean "more than once in a single visit", then that would seem impossible. After the first skip, the object is moving away from the earth. Either it has sufficient energy to depart or it doesn't. If it returns, then it doesn't have enough. Further interactions with the atmosphere won't give it any additional ...


8

I will not commit to a "yes" or "no" answer, but instead refer to examples of artificial objects that do go at least down-up-down. From Space Exploration SE: Did the Apollo Command module really "skip" within, or off of the atmosphere as a part of its reentry program? How does skipping off the atmosphere work? Mathematically, ...


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