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-4

Group Burst Detectors H1,L1,V1 Time of Signal 2020-01-14 02:08:18.230000 UTC Time Sent 2020-01-14 02:48:21 UTC False Alarm Rate once per 25.84 years Central Frequency 64.698303 Hz Duration 0.013534 seconds Map of Orion Constellation for gravity wave S200114f The short burst was part of the problem for Ligo to accurately pinpoint the source of ...


11

No, for several reasons. The expected gravitational wave signature of a core collapse supernova looks nothing like that from a merging black hole binary system, so no sensible comparison can be done with GW150914. The maximum frequency of the gravitational waves from a merger decreases with increasing mass. The expected frequencies from a core collapse are ...


5

Formally, black holes are a prediction of Einstein's theory of gravity. They have been observationally confirmed. Regarding theory: The field equations of Einsteinian gravity, the Einstein Field Equations, admit solutions. The first closed form solution of these equations was found in 1916 by Karl Schwarzschild which is the massive non-rotating, uncharged ...


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The answer is reasonably simple: (nearly) all matter consists of protons, neutrons and electrons, thus of either positively, or negatively charged particles or those with no charge. The next step you need to make is to assume that for some reason whatsoever a black hole accretes more protons than electrons (or vice versa). Such process might be envisionable, ...


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Bond et al. (2017) measure the orbital period of the Sirius system to be $50.1284 \pm 0.0043$ years. I believe this is the most precise and accurate value (I cannot find any more recent papers, with new determinations, that cite this paper). An earlier, comprehensive study by Gatewood & Gatewood (1978) gave $50.090\pm 0.056$ years; consistent with the ...


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Calculations like this one for the orbital period of a binary system are hardly ever done analytically. Astronomers usually take some known approximations and extend it to system like Sirius, and get an estimate for their period numerically (and a good one, by the looks of it). If you're curious, we can derive this version of the 3rd law by considering the ...


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