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I would say that the only way this can be done is making ever more careful observations of the TNOs that are claimed to be affected by this putative black hole. Ultimately such observations should narrow down the location of the object. Even then, confirming it's existence will be very difficult. It will have a small lensing/magnification effect on ...


4

Aside from gravity, electromagnetic forces can change the momentum of a charged black hole. When something falls into a BH momentum is conserved according to every observer, although they may have very different ideas of how that happens. A distant observer will see the new black hole as having some momentum and so moving in some direction relative to the ...


4

Since we know reasonably well that "normal" (stellar sized) black holes do not contribute significantly to dark matter and that the source of energy for gravitational waves is the mass/energy of those black holes when they are in binary systems, then it's hard to how such gravitational waves can contribute to dark matter, especially as they are only emitted ...


3

Answering your first question: If I understand it correctly then the black hole is created by collapse of a super massive star at the end of its life. This star will have a finite mass. Then what leads to the black hole to have such massive gravity so that nothing can escape it (because if it was a star before with a finite mass then it would also ...


2

Can things move faster than light inside the event horizon of a black hole? We don't know. We do not have any accepted, verifiable–or even more essential: falsifiable–theory about the inside of an event horizon. And this is not because our apparatuses aren't powerful enough (yet), it's of a fundamental nature. If something doesn't emit anything, how could ...


1

With increasing dynamical evidence, we should be able to get every better localization and mass for the hypothetical object. With an accurate enough read it should become possible to rule out a conventional planet-like object by lack of direct observations at the predicted location. However, this will not necessarily tell us that the object in question is a ...


1

This is from my general relativity course from many years ago. I don't think there have been any discoveries since that would invalidate it. There is this thing called the no hair theorem for black holes. It states that only a few quantities apply -- mass, angular momentum, and charge I think. Most notably, baryon number is NOT one of the few ...


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