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24 votes
Accepted

On Mars, why are the seasons "strongly amplified" in the southern hemisphere and masked in the northern hemisphere?

Your solution is correct. Mars has a perihelion that is, coincidentally, quite close to the southern Hemisphere summer solstice. Perihelion is actually about one (Earth) month before the solstice. ...
James K's user avatar
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12 votes

On Mars, why are the seasons "strongly amplified" in the southern hemisphere and masked in the northern hemisphere?

Apart from the eccentricity you pointed out that has a role in a difference in the weather, one more factors that plays a role is the difference in the terrain and topology between the hemisphere. ...
Nilay Ghosh's user avatar
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8 votes
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Is Earth's climate significantly different when the one solstice occurs at aphelion rather than the other?

Seasons on the Earth are driven primarily by axial tilt. I'm writing this answer in late August, when the Earth is a bit past aphelion. That event currently occurs in early July, a couple of weeks ...
David Hammen's user avatar
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8 votes
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Tidally locked Venus, is it possible and consequences?

It may not be possible for Venus to become tidal locked I don't think we know if it's possible for Venus to become tidally locked. Correia et al. 2008 expect the equilibrium rotation to differ from ...
Connor Garcia's user avatar
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6 votes

Consequences of strong wind on an alien Planet on the possibility of life

We know that life can start and evolve quite well on a planet with 250 mph winds: You're living on one. The jet stream can reach this speed in the Earth's atmosphere. Beyond that it is speculation. ...
James K's user avatar
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6 votes

Impact of Atmospheric Water vapour on Optical Observations

There is actualy very little water vapour absorption in the optical part of the spectrum (350 - 750 nm). If "optical" is extended (as it often is) to include that part of the spectrum where ...
ProfRob's user avatar
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5 votes

Impact of Atmospheric Water vapour on Optical Observations

Yes, water vapour interferes even stronger with astronomical observations than $\rm CO_2$. In the optical, water easily forms droplets which scatter light. But also in the gaseous phase water has ...
AtmosphericPrisonEscape's user avatar
5 votes

Is Earth's climate significantly different when the one solstice occurs at aphelion rather than the other?

I'm not sure how much this will add that hasn't already been said, but maybe a few details. You're asking about one of the 3 Milankovich Cycles, called precession and it does play a role, usually ...
userLTK's user avatar
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4 votes
Accepted

What does "Active Weather Patterns" mean?

It means that Titan has weather (driven by methane rather than water) and that it's weather changes with the seasons. Cassini has been observing Titan for almost half of a Titan year, which is 29.457 ...
David Hammen's user avatar
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4 votes
Accepted

Are we so sure global warming is a result of humans burning fossil fuels?

We know a lot about the sun. It isn't the main cause of global warming, as we can monitor exactly how much energy it is producing. The sun's output can fluctuate though, and we have yet to measure how ...
Featherball's user avatar
4 votes

Counter clockwise rotation of storms at Jupiter's north pole. What explanations have been proposed?

Let my try to stretch the analogy to anticyclonic tornados: The vast majority of all tornados move cyclonic, i.e. counterclockwise on the Northern Hemnisphere of our blue planet. There is e.g. a ...
B--rian's user avatar
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3 votes
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Could diatom blooms affect albedo of an exoplanet?

First off, I am rather certain that by diatom bloom you refer to algal bloom which is a seasonal change of sea color, at least here on Earth, the only system we have observed yet. Your question is ...
B--rian's user avatar
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