51

Yes, the shape of the constellation does and will change over time. All the stars have their own peculiar velocities and have some random motion which over time will ruin all the constellations. However, Even though the stars are moving at rapid speeds, to us, in our sky, due to their enormous distance from us, they appear to move extremely slowly and the ...


34

As mentioned, these are the Pleiades, and the belt of Orion. These are visible in the South at this time of year. The Big and Little Dippers are in the North, so turn around. The best way to find them is a map: I've marked the approximate edge of your photo, with Orion, the V of the Hyades and the small cluster called the Pleiades. The big dipper is much ...


20

Here's an animation I found that gives you an idea of the movements and timescales involved: It depicts the estimated movement of the Orion Constellation from 3 million years in the past to 3 million years in the future.


19

It is true that, for an observer standing on Earth, the daytime sky blocks out our ability to see the stars (with the exception that stars are visible during a total eclipse). It is possible to get pretty close. In a different post, it was asked if the the center of the galaxy is only visible for 1/2 of the days of the year. That post is here: Is it true ...


15

Yes, those are the Pleiades. The form corresponds exactly to the photo below: (source: Star-Gazing - the disk below the Pleiades is Venus, this is a photo from April) As @theWrongAlice says, they're not a constellation, but they are part of Taurus (the Bull).


15

If it was rather small, I suppose you were looking at the Pleiades, which is an open star cluster (not a constellation). Take a look at this web application: https://stellarium-web.org/ You can set a time and location and find constellations and other objects really easily.


13

The group of stars circled at the top of the photo is a star cluster named Pleiades. The Pleiades are in the constellation of Taurus. The group of stars circled at the bottom of the photo is part of the constellation of Orion. The three vertical stars on the left side of the circle are the belt stars of Orion. His upper body is to the upper left, and one leg ...


13

You can see the constellation Orion on this photo: (Screenshot from Stellarium) Aligning the original photo with this screenshot, I found the highlighted stars to be the following:


9

The constellation in the lower right is Orion, characterized by its famous "belt" of 3 stars. The two stars in the top center and top right belong to Taurus, the latter being Aldebaran. I am not sure about the stars to the left, it seems like it's part of Gemini.


8

In such situations, I find Astrometry.net particularly helpful. Feeding it your image, I got this result: Of course, the stars Pleione, Sterope, and Taygeta are enough to identify the Pleiades. While in this case it's fairly easy to identify the Pleiades by inspection alone and verify this, for less recognisable cases Astrometry.net is a very handy tool. ...


6

WD 1856b is not more massive than the star it orbits. The radius of WD 1856b is much larger than its star because its star is a white dwarf; but WD 1856b is much less massive. That gives the star a diameter of a bit larger than Earth while the planet's size is about that of Jupiter. The star, WD 1856+534 is about 1/2 the mass of our Sun or about 500 Jupiter ...


5

What you have shown is almost the complete "Winter Hexagon", an asterism composed of Rigel, Aldebaran, Capella, Pollux, Procyon, and Sirius. Capella and Sirius are slightly out of frame in your picture: If you have the chance, you might want to look at the position marked by the green dot, either with a telescope or binoculars.


4

The Milky Way takes 225-250 Million years for one rotation (at Sol's radius). Humanity has been here, and looking up, for, at most (and to make the numbers easier) 10,000 years. 10,000 / 250,000,000 = 0.00004 We (humanity) have been seeing stars for 4 hundred-thousandths of a revolution, or 0.0144 degrees of rotation. The constellations change, we just haven'...


4

The Zodiac sign of a month is decided by the month when the Sun is "in" that sign from the point of view of Earth. (See Mike G's comment below - because of the precession of the Earth, Zodiac signs are now 30 degrees "off" from their original markings/associations with the months of the year.) I believe that August is actually the month ...


4

The key number you need to find is the "right ascension" This tell you the "longitude" of the constellation, relative to the other stars in the sky. It is measured in hours and minutes Bootes has a right ascention of about 14:30 This means that on the day of the spring equinox (March 21) it will culminate at 02:30 (in local solar time, ...


3

If the coordinates are precessed to epoch B1875.0, the constellation boundaries lie neatly along the equatorial coordinate grid, allowing simpler tests against boundary segments. Roman 1987 describes a basic algorithm and provides implementations in C and F77. Glaschke 2010 makes a binary partition of the sky for fast lookup and provides an implementation in ...


2

The image of Draco has definitely been altered. Most of the stars in Draco are quite faint, even the ones making the dragon shape, whereas in the image they are all shown as bigger/brighter than the stars in Ursa Minor (the quadrilateral in the middle with 3 stars trailing down to the lower left. The last of the 3 is polaris, which is in reality brighter ...


2

Star constellations are not visible during the day, but they are at night. The sun entering a constellation means that it rises in a constellation, i.e. if you look at the night sky just before dawn at the place where the Sun will rise, you will see that constellation. Also cultures differ in what they consider the start of a new day. In Judaism, for ...


1

I realized it's the problem of checking whether a point is inside a spherical polygon or not. See e.g. https://github.com/LeoAlexandrov/Spherical. But I recommend Roman's implementation, much shorter and simpler (see the accepted answer).


1

The top circled stars are the Pleiades Cluster, aka the Seven Sisters. The other forms part of Orion and you can actually see towards the bottom where the Great Nebula at Orion is located. Hope this helps.


1

If actual photographs are not required, Stellarium could render a suitable set of reference images. Use the Perspective (gnomonic) projection for the closest match to a photograph, and display only the features you want. Its scripting capability may help you avoid repeating some manual operations. Here are a sample pair of Stellarium images. The first has ...


1

I've just submitted a cropped section to Astrometry.net (that's astrometry, not astronomy). Click the "web" to upload an image and start the search, then take some time to read How (the heck) does Astrometry.net work? while waiting for it to compute... No quick solution. That doesn't mean that this isn't real, it's just that the first attempt didn'...


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